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I am looking at purchasing a new fury. I thought they had ABS versions, but the dealer says the new bikes don't. I figured you guys could help me out. The honda website doesn't list ABS as an option. Whats the story. Thanks in advance and also any advice about the bike appreciated.
Thanks
Mike
 

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Your best bet is to call around the dealers and see if you can find some new old stock. The big problem in the US is that the non ABS model was $1000 cheaper and ABS only came in black, this resulted in more people buying the non ABS model. Here in Australia we only got ABS bikes and we got them in the best colours over the years so we have no problem with non ABS vs ABS.
 

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...in the US is that the non ABS model was $1000 cheaper and ABS only came in black
The 2019 ABS is a beautiful blue, and last I knew there were still some new ones out there. Your dealer has resources to find one.

Is it truly ABS or is it just a linked braking system?
True ABS, front and back, plus connected brakes. If you operate only the rear brake, you get something like 40% front 60% rear. Operating only the front does not apply the rear brake at all.
 

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The 2019 ABS is a beautiful blue, and last I knew there were still some new ones out there. Your dealer has resources to find one.



True ABS, front and back, plus connected brakes. If you operate only the rear brake, you get something like 40% front 60% rear. Operating only the front does not apply the rear brake at all.
I doubt if you use the foot (rear) brake that you get the figures you quote. After having an ABS bike for over 11 years I can confirm that when you apply the "rear" brake you get 100% of the rear brake applied and the centre piston on the front caliper activated. As the centre piston on the front caliper is much smaller than the other pistons you probably get something like 20% of the front activated. So the breakdown is something like R 100% F 20% or less. You can't feel the front being activated when you use the "rear" only so there can't be a lot of force applied to the front. Additionally there is a pressure limiting valve so that you can't apply too much force to the front when using the "rear" brake.

@Kbuskill should be able to fill in the gaps in my explanation as he went right into the linked brakes of the ABS bike when he converted his non ABS bike to a linked brake set up with the ABS calipers and associated plumbing.
 

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I doubt if you use the foot (rear) brake that you get the figures you quote. After having an ABS bike for over 11 years I can confirm that when you apply the "rear" brake you get 100% of the rear brake applied and the centre piston on the front caliper activated. As the centre piston on the front caliper is much smaller than the other pistons you probably get something like 20% of the front activated. So the breakdown is something like R 100% F 20% or less. You can't feel the front being activated when you use the "rear" only so there can't be a lot of force applied to the front. Additionally there is a pressure limiting valve so that you can't apply too much force to the front when using the "rear" brake.

@Kbuskill should be able to fill in the gaps in my explanation as he went right into the linked brakes of the ABS bike when he converted his non ABS bike to a linked brake set up with the ABS calipers and associated plumbing.
I can't remember the exact figures for piston size on ABS vs non-ABS brakes, because that seems like a lifetime ago, but it is around here somewhere because I had researched and crunched all the numbers before taking the leap and converting the bike over.

If anyone was interested they could probably search the forum for "Big Brake Upgrade" and all the pertinent info should be in there.
 

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I doubt if you use the foot (rear) brake that you get the figures you quote. After having an ABS bike for over 11 years I can confirm that when you apply the "rear" brake you get 100% of the rear brake applied and the centre piston on the front caliper activated. As the centre piston on the front caliper is much smaller than the other pistons you probably get something like 20% of the front activated. So the breakdown is something like R 100% F 20% or less. You can't feel the front being activated when you use the "rear" only so there can't be a lot of force applied to the front. Additionally there is a pressure limiting valve so that you can't apply too much force to the front when using the "rear" brake.

@Kbuskill should be able to fill in the gaps in my explanation as he went right into the linked brakes of the ABS bike when he converted his non ABS bike to a linked brake set up with the ABS calipers and associated plumbing.
I stand corrected. Indeed, the 2019 manual says "operating the rear brake pedal applies the rear brake and a portion of the front brake."

I must have pulled the numbers from the air.

In any case, using both brakes is always recommended of course.

And while the topic is live, the fatal accident statistics for ABS vs. non-ABS bikes were compelling to me when I was shopping. I'm glad I got an ABS-equipped bike.
 
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