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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Today, went for the usual, relaxing back country ride.

On the way back, the clutch cable suddenly snapped (30 miles from home).

Should have known something was up since I was having to do some recent free play adjustments.

At almost 28k miles I admit no maintenance , lube or inspection (clutch cable). The clutch worked smoothly right up to when it snapped.

The 1st event on way home (clutchless) was at the US Border Patrol checkpoint. They made me come to a complete stop with the speed bumps as a bonus...couldn't get in neutral in time. It was the closest I have ever gotten to a complete drop. Believe me, it was dangerous and very difficult to get going again with the incline.

On the rest of the way home I was contemplating the safest route and to avoid traffic lights and stop signs .

I realized the biggest challenge was 1 mile from home...hard right (45 °) with sand usually involved as a bonus.

I actually locked down my modular helmet preparing for the worst. I got lucky.

Worst riding day ever.

I don't recommend riding clutchless unless you are a very experienced rider.

Lesson learned...maintain, inspect, and lube your clutch cable.

It could ruin your day in the worst way.
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Discussion Starter #4
I too have never lubed the clutch cable - what do y'all recommend/use?
I'm going to clean out the area where the cable connects and slides through with contact cleaner.

I would disconnect your cable at lever to brush out any particles or rust.

Then use a little silicone spray.

I think I bought at Walmart auto department.
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I too have never lubed the clutch cable - what do y'all recommend/use?
 

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This is always a concern of mine. Only had one bike where the clutch cable broke. Don't remember it being too bad of an experience, but that was a much smaller, more easily maneuverable bike. I think maybe I'll just buy a new clutch cable soon as preventative maintenance.
 

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So just as a heads up lubing the clutch cable isn't going to to anything for a cable that fails in fatigue. The only thing lubing a cable will to will keep the actuation smooth. Lubing does not change any of the material properties of a steel cable. Everyone should check for any cable rub...ie metal on metal. These cables are wear items. I guess I'm a bit more in tune with periodically changing and inspecting them due to riding mountain bikes/dirtbikes. @FuryInAlpine is correct with the lesson learned though (glad you're ok!) is to inspect that cable. It's a cheap part, it's worth changing out every couple of riding seasons. If you change the cable, it's good practice to change up the housing. If you're noticing that it's getting harder to pull the clutch, it's usually never the cable but in fact it's the cable's housing getting gummed up.

Do NOT use grease on anything that is internally routed inside of a housing. Even if it seems protected, that housing is not completely sealed. Grease collects dust and contaminates will clog up that housing, making it harder for that cable to actuate which can lead to the failure of the cable if you keep pulling on it. When you change the cable and housing, a LIGHT coat of lubricating oil is all that is necessary on the cable. A few drips down the barrel of the housing at the top and let gravity do the work. Gravity and actuating of the cable will allow it to run to the bottom. I do not recommend using a "pool" of lube. You're just asking for problems if you do it that way.

@FuryInAlpine, sounds like a very dangerous situation without having the clutch. Glad you're ok

@aces and eights, I actually practice float shifting in my car and truck for this exact reason. Takes a combo of knowing the RPM's you can up/downshift and the rev matching rpm's to get it back into gear. It's pretty tricky but I think it's something everyone with a manual should practice!
 
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Oiling the clutch cable isn't going to do anything for a cable that fails in fatigue but it might prevent the fatigue or lessen the rate of fatigue

Adding one drop of oil at time will work as long as you know the oil has reached the bottom

I have used the baggy method for a few decades with no problems to report just a smoother clutch pull :)

My Fury clutch cable is due for a grease/oil job next year, I will report back on the pull
 

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Discussion Starter #9
This is always a concern of mine. Only had one bike where the clutch cable broke. Don't remember it being too bad of an experience, but that was a much smaller, more easily maneuverable bike. I think maybe I'll just buy a new clutch cable soon as preventative maintenance.
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Here is the correct part # the local dealer starting price was $28... somehow it ended up at $20 fortunately.

I'm pretty sure failure was due to corrosion. Couple years ago got drenched in a summer monsoon style rainstorm. I should have WD40 ed the whole bike afterwards, especially the exposed clutch cable.

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Probably a good idea to treat clutch lever cable area with WD40 after washing or exposure to rain.

In previous close up you can see rust colored particles at lever area.

Going to clean out area using WD40 instead of contact cleaner and then treat with silicone spray.



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That definitely can classify as flooding...
 

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Discussion Starter #12
This is always a concern of mine. Only had one bike where the clutch cable broke. Don't remember it being too bad of an experience, but that was a much smaller, more easily maneuverable bike. I think maybe I'll just buy a new clutch cable soon as preventative maintenance.
Picked up and installed new cable.
E Z job , all you need is a 12mm or a crescent or pliers.

I noticed the new cable has a plastic or teflon/nylon wrap at the ball where it fits into the lever. That is probably the weak point and is where my cable broke.

Save your money and loosen the freeplay and pull the cable out completely from the lever and inspect. Not sure if the nylon sleeve is OEM or if considered time to replace if worn through or completely missing ?? If cable is not frayed thoroughly clean out (with soft brush ) lever hole with WD40 and lube cable and hole with silicone, reassemble and adjust.

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A little bit sceptical of Honda dealer.
There E-Bay store said "last one" Monday so I stopped by to pick it up and they had to order it...hmmm, . Today , Friday when I picked up cable it was still listed for sale as "last one", pretty sloppy.

What's interesting is the Honda label with there ad is covering up "Made in China", did I get a real OEM Honda part ?? Was OEM made in China ?

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Picked up and installed new cable.
E Z job , all you need is a 12mm or a crescent or pliers.

I noticed the new cable has a plastic or teflon/nylon wrap at the ball where it fits into the lever. That is probably the weak point and is where my cable broke.

Save your money and loosen the freeplay and pull the cable out completely from the lever and inspect. Not sure if the nylon sleeve is OEM or if considered time to replace if worn through or completely missing ?? If cable is not frayed thoroughly clean out (with soft brush ) lever hole with WD40 and lube cable and hole with silicone, reassemble and adjust.

View attachment 235496

A little bit sceptical of Honda dealer.
There E-Bay store said "last one" Monday so I stopped by to pick it up and they had to order it...hmmm, . Today , Friday when I picked up cable it was still listed for sale as "last one", pretty sloppy.

What's interesting is the Honda label with there ad is covering up "Made in China", did I get a real OEM Honda part ?? Was OEM made in China ?

View attachment 235497

View attachment 235498
It probably is a Honda part. Lots of stuff comes from China, just look at Harley Davidson.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Did a Presidents Day 100 mile solo ride. My second ride since cable replacement.

With the new cable I'm getting full clutch disengagement allowing silky smooth shifts, very happy.

I'm thinking that cable replacement maybe should be a part of regular maintenance at 15k-20k miles. Even with proper free play a fatigued cable may not disengage clutch enough for a smooth shift.

Also, as I was riding I looked down and noticed the split at the adjustment was facing up. This would let debris and moisture from washing or rain to pool at the cable end allowing rust and eventual failure.

Check and adjust your cable adjuster so the gap is angled down to prolong cable life !

THIS HAS BEEN A PSA !

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Regular lubing the cable will extend the cable life no mater what the position of the cable adjuster is. I think people like Bill (460) and Clueless would have the answer to the adjustment position
 
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