Honda Fury Forums: banner
1 - 20 of 62 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The only downside I can think of is the functional disadvantages of a chopper style (discomfort, handling, turn radius, tough for long rides), but I can’t seem to find a dirt owner that isn’t extremely happy with the bike. I don’t need an unbelievably comfortable bike, but want to avoid back pain. I don’t anticipate going on huge rides. I live in a mountainous areaa so there are lots of twists and turns which may be a downside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,899 Posts
The only downside I can think of is the functional disadvantages of a chopper style (discomfort, handling, turn radius, tough for long rides), but I can’t seem to find a dirt owner that isn’t extremely happy with the bike. I don’t need an unbelievably comfortable bike, but want to avoid back pain. I don’t anticipate going on huge rides. I live in a mountainous areaa so there are lots of twists and turns which may be a downside.
I haven't found a downside to the Fury yet. Other than I keep spending money on modifications.

Mine doesn't give me back pain and I am on the stock seat. But that can be a function of rider as well. It does have a big turning radius. But I don't normally do circl;es, so it's fine. As far as twists, the Fury handles great. Low center of gravity, light so it is easy to toss around. I would always recommend this bike to anybody that is considering it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,503 Posts
The only downside I can think of is the functional disadvantages of a chopper style (discomfort, handling, turn radius, tough for long rides), but I can’t seem to find a dirt owner that isn’t extremely happy with the bike. I don’t need an unbelievably comfortable bike, but want to avoid back pain. I don’t anticipate going on huge rides. I live in a mountainous areaa so there are lots of twists and turns which may be a downside.
How tall are you? It is going to boil down to that. I'm 6'3" and this is the most comfortable bike that I have owned. Everything else is just personal preference.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,189 Posts
Admittedly, I own far more comfortable motorcycles. My Honda V-65 Magna with a removable windshield is far more plush, far faster, wayyyy easier to drive, and also thin and kind of sexy. However, nothing, nothing beats the Fury when it comes to a relationship.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,823 Posts
Admittedly, I own far more comfortable motorcycles. My Honda V-65 Magna with a removable windshield is far more plush, far faster, wayyyy easier to drive, and also thin and kind of sexy. However, nothing, nothing beats the Fury when it comes to a relationship.
I really did love my old V-65. It was the best bike I ever had, other than that high speed front end wobble around 110 MPH. Very comfortable though and very easy to control.......under 110.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Admittedly, I own far more comfortable motorcycles. My Honda V-65 Magna with a removable windshield is far more plush, far faster, wayyyy easier to drive, and also thin and kind of sexy. However, nothing, nothing beats the Fury when it comes to a relationship.
The V-65 wasn’t available here I’m sure yet there was a model which looked similar however it was a 750 (V45 I’ve read). I bought a VF750FD in 1984 & it ate the hard facing of the cam lobes. It had a history of very troublesome cams. Hell of a great handling bike for its time yet I still managed to set several world records of the longest tank slappers with its 16” front
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,189 Posts
I really did love my old V-65. It was the best bike I ever had, other than that high speed front end wobble around 110 MPH. Very comfortable though and very easy to control.......under 110.
I experienced the death-wobble changing lanes on the freew-- certified race track at something like 135 MPH, the small continuous parting line between the lanes was enough to "catch" the front tire. That raked-out front without a steering damper was pretty wild when something upset it. I acted as the damper which only helped slow how fast the oscillations were building, then hit the rear brake hard; once below 110 MPH all was good like nothing happened...it was an eery feeling I didn't soon dismiss.

The V65 had crazy power though, I rarely took it out of overdrive to pass. Before all these current-day freeway on-ramps were built I was sitting on a country road at the edge of a very busy freeway and after waiting a long time picked a narrow opening--maybe four or five car lengths to go from dead-stop to freeway speed. 0 to 65 in 1st seemed nearly instantaneous. I was young, had lightning-quick reflexes, and stupid.
 

·
Registered
2011 Fury
Joined
·
974 Posts
I haven't found a downside to the Fury yet. Other than I keep spending money on modifications.

Mine doesn't give me back pain and I am on the stock seat. But that can be a function of rider as well. It does have a big turning radius. But I don't normally do circl;es, so it's fine. As far as twists, the Fury handles great. Low center of gravity, light so it is easy to toss around. I would always recommend this bike to anybody that is considering it.
I second that…. I’m 2 years in and luv this bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,823 Posts
I experienced the death-wobble changing lanes on the freew-- certified race track at something like 135 MPH, the small continuous parting line between the lanes was enough to "catch" the front tire. That raked-out front without a steering damper was pretty wild when something upset it. I acted as the damper which only helped slow how fast the oscillations were building, then hit the rear brake hard; once below 110 MPH all was good like nothing happened...it was an eery feeling I didn't soon dismiss.

The V65 had crazy power though, I rarely took it out of overdrive to pass. Before all these current-day freeway on-ramps were built I was sitting on a country road at the edge of a very busy freeway and after waiting a long time picked a narrow opening--maybe four or five car lengths to go from dead-stop to freeway speed. 0 to 65 in 1st seemed nearly instantaneous. I was young, had lightning-quick reflexes, and stupid.
Whether accelerating or decelerating, when passing through 110 the wobble would hit almost every time. Other than that, I loved that bike. I have never been in or on any other vehicle doing 140 MPH before or since. For me, that's too fast, at least on public roads.
 

·
Registered
2011 Fury
Joined
·
974 Posts
Whether accelerating or decelerating, when passing through 110 the wobble would hit almost every time. Other than that, I loved that bike. I have never been in or on any other vehicle doing 140 MPH before or since. For me, that's too fast, at least on public roads.
I’ve been over 190 in my Vette, 198 on my Ninja, 120 on my Vulcan, 188 in my 67 Camaro SS, I’ve even be clocked on my Banshee at 105 on the street…. I love going fast but age has retired my inner speed demon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,823 Posts
I’ve been over 190 in my Vette, 198 on my Ninja, 120 on my Vulcan, 188 in my 67 Camaro SS, I’ve even be clocked on my Banshee at 105 on the street…. I love going fast but age has retired my inner speed demon.
Same here. Even back then when I was young doing 140, I remember thinking that if a turtle walks out on the road, I'm dead. Everything starts to look different at those speeds.

Now days, I'd prefer something with low end power that throws you back. I don't even care to go over 60 MPH. I just want to be able to get up to that speed extremely quick. Unfortunately I have nothing like that at the moment.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,280 Posts
The "small" tank is not a problem for me as by the time I need fuel I need to stop and pee anyway if I am doing a long ride. Around town, riding to work and back I get 160 to 180 KLM before the fuel light comes on. That works out to more than a week of running around, so the "small" tank is still not an issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,823 Posts
The "small" tank is not a problem for me as by the time I need fuel I need to stop and pee anyway if I am doing a long ride. Around town, riding to work and back I get 160 to 180 KLM before the fuel light comes on. That works out to more than a week of running around, so the "small" tank is still not an issue.
It's never been too much of an issue for me, but there are some rides I go on where I stop to top off the fuel tank at the first gas station I come to just to make sure I can make it to the next one. I would really like to have a bigger tank so I didn't have to worry about running out of fuel. When I'm out in the middle of nowhere enjoying the back roads, some of those little towns don't have gas stations. I'd hate to have to knock on someone's door begging them to take some cash for their lawnmower gas.
 
1 - 20 of 62 Posts
Top