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All the gas in PA, at least in my area, has 10% ethanol added. Does this effect engine performance? Would useing a higher octane rateing help? What is the horsepower rateing for the Fury? With the power the Fury has it is hard to believe it only has 52 HP as I have read on other forums. I tried the search function and didn't see my specific questions answered. Thanks in advance.
 

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All the gas in PA, at least in my area, has 10% ethanol added. Does this effect engine performance? Would useing a higher octane rateing help? What is the horsepower rateing for the Fury? With the power the Fury has it is hard to believe it only has 52 HP as I have read on other forums. I tried the search function and didn't see my specific questions answered. Thanks in advance.
I'm not for sure what to say about the fuel. Some will say it doesn't hurt- others will say it does. I just run the regular gas in mine and every now and then I'll put in middle grade to help clean it a little. I have read on here somewhere and I can't remember the thread where a person gives a very good explanation on the octane levels on gas and how it effects things. Maybe someone else with a better memory can post the thread where that is.
I know the cycle shop i go to sells an additive for that very purpose.

As to the horse power; my salesman told me it was like 65-67 HP on a fury
 

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I use 91 BUT..... Thats just me....

Stated on forum before.
Has more to do with HIGH compression motor over 10:1, the higher the octane the less mis-fire/ re-fire issue in cylinder using less fuel for same explosion/ retarding pre explosions. The Fury is 9.2:1 compression or so, so anything over 89 is a waste of money as MANY other on this site have stated.

PS.
My 02' BMW ONLY takes 91 octane or higher. the motor is like 12:1 compression ratio, wife filled it with 89 octane 2 x's and cost us alot of money to repair it, due to mis-fires and replacing all the plugs and coil packs. Motor would nt idle or start easily...

P.S.S
Someone one this site stated that almost a 1/2 gallon of fuel you pump is from the last person. Meaning if the last person got 87 octane, you pick 91 you wil get a 1/4 gallon of 87 octane so that probably more true with single line gas pumps.

Shaft drives are heavy and steal HP!
More like 56 HP at rear wheel, 60-62 hp at crank if LUCKY!
Have heard and read that shaft drive and OEM exhaust take away 6-8 hp.
 

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Stated on forum before.
Has more to do with HIGH compression motor over 10:1, the higher the octane the less mis-fire/ re-fire issue in cylinder using less fuel for same explosion/ retarding pre explosions. The Fury is 9.2:1 compression or so, so anything over 89 is a waste of money as MANY other on this site have stated.

PS.
My 02' BMW ONLY takes 91 octane or higher. the motor is like 12:1 compression ratio, wife filled it with 89 octane 2 x's and cost us alot of money to repair it, due to mis-fires and replacing all the plugs and coil packs. Motor would nt idle or start easily...

P.S.S
Someone one this site stated that almost a 1/2 gallon of fuel you pump is from the last person. Meaning if the last person got 87 octane, you pick 91 you wil get a 1/4 gallon of 87 octane so that probably more true with single line gas pumps.

Shaft drives are heavy and steal HP!
More like 56 HP at rear wheel, 60-62 hp at crank if LUCKY!
Have heard and read that shaft drive and OEM exhaust take away 6-8 hp.
the fuel from the other person is only if the pump has one hose to service all three octanes.try to use pumps that have three hoses or one for each pump.
 

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The pumping the other guys gas thing does make sense. Sux that all the stations around here only have one hose.
 

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The 10% ethanol mix is almost everywhere, Certain places (racetracks, airports, marina's dont have it) I fill up everytime im in the keys because some of their gas stations don't have 10% since they have so many boats in the area. The problem with 10% is it absorbs moisture from the air so it can cause the gas to go bad faster, and alcohol burns at a colder temp leaving your cyls cool and causing a lean issue if the system isnt set up for 10%.

There are treatments you can mix into the fuel to help somewhat offset the effects of the 10% ethanol mix. If you want you can look into some marine discussions on the topic, It has been going on for a few years and the outboard 4strokes are built with very tight tolerances making them very iratible with 10%.

Yes E10 takes away a little performance, yes octane ratings effect performance but your tuning has to be setup for it.
 

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The 10% ethanol mix is almost everywhere, Certain places (racetracks, airports, marina's dont have it) I fill up everytime im in the keys because some of their gas stations don't have 10% since they have so many boats in the area. The problem with 10% is it absorbs moisture from the air so it can cause the gas to go bad faster, and alcohol burns at a colder temp leaving your cyls cool and causing a lean issue if the system isnt set up for 10%.

There are treatments you can mix into the fuel to help somewhat offset the effects of the 10% ethanol mix. If you want you can look into some marine discussions on the topic, It has been going on for a few years and the outboard 4strokes are built with very tight tolerances making them very iratible with 10%.

Yes E10 takes away a little performance, yes octane ratings effect performance but your tuning has to be setup for it.
Think I even saw it in the owner's manual, that it is good for the 10% ethanol... maybe try looking there if you are around the manual.
 

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"Boaters are now faced with a new problem - ethanol fuel. For years, gasoline contained MTBE, an additive which controls the fuel's octane properties. The additive is being phased out, and now much of the nation's fuel supply is a blend of 10% ethanol and 90% gasoline, commonly referred to as E-10 fuel.

Ethanol presents several problems to boaters. The immediate impact of the formulation is a loss of horsepower and fuel economy. Early indications show drops of 3-5 % in of both categories. The loss of range sounds small, but adds up on boats that are often already stretched to the limit in terms of fuel needs. Additionally, ethanol is a very effective solvent, and has a tendency to dissolve old coatings of varnish and dirt in existing fuel systems. This can lead to plugged fuel filters, and other mechanical problems.

The added amounts of particles associated with ethanol fuel may warrant upgrading filter systems. Many engineers are now recommending that boats using ethanol fuel need to use 10 micron filters. Pre-E-10 systems will likely be using 28 micron filters. Manufacturers such as Yamaha have been quick to respond to ethanol fuel use by introducing replacement 10 micron filters.

The corrosive nature of ethanol can affect fuel lines and other components, causing them to crack and fail. Many older boats will require replacement of all fuel hoses and possibly other system components. Especially affected are boats equipped with fiberglass tanks. Many older vessels must have the fiberglass tanks replaced prior to using E-10 fuels, or face certain engine failures.

Water in E-10 fuel is another problem that boaters must deal with. The introduction of water on E-10 fuel can be disasterous. E-10 can hold up to four teaspoons of water in suspension per gallon. Once this saturation point is exceeded, the solution separates and the gas floats on top while the ethanol and water mix on the bottom. This event is called "phase separation". Ethanol fuel can absorb enough water to reach it's phase separation point in just over 3 months at 70% humidity.

While the phase separation slurry in itself can cause problems by clogging fuel systems, the more immediate problem is that the remaining gasoline has now lost it's original octane value which can cause poor running and in some cases engine damage. When phase separation occurs, the fuel should be drained and replaced.

Fuel storage and winterization has to be handled differently when using E-10 fuels. Manufacturers are warning that fuels need to be stabilized if un-used for as little as 2 weeks. Not all stabilizers are known to be E-10 compatible. Non-alcohol based fuel stabilizer additives are a must for ethanol fuel."

The fact our bikes can run it doesnt mean it is good. The components are required to be adaptable between the fuels and it has slowly been getting integrated into the industry since about 1988. Shelf life on gas has been cut to depending on who you talk to from 45-90 days, then you have to consider distribution time, and time you have it. I have had gas only last about 1-2 weeks at my house.

For a vehicle to be classified as being able to run it certain grades of hoses and seals must be used in the fuel system, and certain tuning tollerances need to be allowed.
 

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Not sure if the information in the manual is based on technical specs, or an emotional pacifier because we are all forced to live with the ethanol issue. I was curious too so I went to the manual. It states that the engine can handle up to 10% ethanol (or other types of oxygenated fuels). As to the octane rating, use 86 or higher. It does not state that anything is too high.

In my area probably 80% of the suppliers are now adding ethanol, and the standard octane grade is 84-85. Since the ethanol addition, I noticed that my old Shadow runs pretty crappy with the standard grade that I have been using. The Fury is so new, I don't feel too much difference between grades, but have been putting mid grade (87 octane) anyway, and sometimes premium. In Utah we have very limited riding season, and I figure if I spend an extra $10-20 in gas running higher octane durring the summer, big deal. Better than running crap through the engine.
 

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Not sure if the information in the manual is based on technical specs, or an emotional pacifier because we are all forced to live with the ethanol issue. I was curious too so I went to the manual. It states that the engine can handle up to 10% ethanol (or other types of oxygenated fuels). As to the octane rating, use 86 or higher. It does not state that anything is too high.

In my area probably 80% of the suppliers are now adding ethanol, and the standard octane grade is 84-85. Since the ethanol addition, I noticed that my old Shadow runs pretty crappy with the standard grade that I have been using. The Fury is so new, I don't feel too much difference between grades, but have been putting mid grade (87 octane) anyway, and sometimes premium. In Utah we have very limited riding season, and I figure if I spend an extra $10-20 in gas running higher octane durring the summer, big deal. Better than running crap through the engine.
From the FAQ for you as the research has been done before us by the VTX forums:

Q: What type of gas should I use in the Fury?

A: Owner's Manual says 86 octane (U.S. Rating), use as close as you can to this! DO NOT USE 91 OR 93 OR WHATEVER TYPE OF OCTANE GAS THAT YOU THINK THAT IS RIGHT FOR THE BIKE (INSIDE U.S.) , THE MANUFACTURER'S OF THIS BIKE HAVE MORE MECHANICAL KNOWLEDGE OF THIS BIKE THAN YOU DO! Facts Thread: What Octane Gas in the VTX? By Tapper - VTXOA

Australia also uses 91,95 & 98 octane (RON), so please refer to your international owner's manual for your proper octane ratings and stay as close as you can to that rating.
 

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Here is a really good description of octane rating stolen from another website.

The octane rating of gasoline tells you how much the fuel can be compressed before it spontaneously ignites. When gas ignites by compression rather than because of the spark from the spark plug, it causes knocking in the engine. Knocking can damage an engine, so it is not something you want to have happening. Lower-octane gas (like "regular" 87-octane gasoline) can handle the least amount of compression before igniting.

The compression ratio of your engine determines the octane rating of the gas you must use in the car. One way to increase the horsepower of an engine of a given displacement is to increase its compression ratio. So a "high-performance engine" has a higher compression ratio and requires higher-octane fuel. The advantage of a high compression ratio is that it gives your engine a higher horsepower rating for a given engine weight -- that is what makes the engine "high performance." The disadvantage is that the gasoline for your engine costs more
 

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Here is a really good description of octane rating stolen from another website.

The octane rating of gasoline tells you how much the fuel can be compressed before it spontaneously ignites. When gas ignites by compression rather than because of the spark from the spark plug, it causes knocking in the engine. Knocking can damage an engine, so it is not something you want to have happening. Lower-octane gas (like "regular" 87-octane gasoline) can handle the least amount of compression before igniting.

The compression ratio of your engine determines the octane rating of the gas you must use in the car. One way to increase the horsepower of an engine of a given displacement is to increase its compression ratio. So a "high-performance engine" has a higher compression ratio and requires higher-octane fuel. The advantage of a high compression ratio is that it gives your engine a higher horsepower rating for a given engine weight -- that is what makes the engine "high performance." The disadvantage is that the gasoline for your engine costs more
Correct, and the engineer's at Honda designed this engine with 86 octane in mind, this is why we should use as close as we can to 86 as possible, determining on the region of course.
 

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You could tune the motor to run high octane fuel if you mess with the timing but it wouldnt give much if any of a performance difference.
 

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as with any motor, increase the octane the better the gas. yes the specs say 86 oct. but that is the minimum.

Think about it this way, if you eat mcDonalds double cheesberger every day, you will live, however you will have health issues, vs eating a healthy meal you will feel better and live longer!
 

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as with any motor, increase the octane the better the gas. yes the specs say 86 oct. but that is the minimum.

Think about it this way, if you eat mcDonalds double cheesberger every day, you will live, however you will have health issues, vs eating a healthy meal you will feel better and live longer!
Incorrect, the Engineer's are smarter than you that made this motorcycle, many people think that what you said is fact, but the ACTUAL fact is again, they engineered this engine to a certain spec, please read the entire thread to the link that I posted below.

What Octane Gas in the VTX? By Tapper - VTXOA
 

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From the FAQ for you as the research has been done before us by the VTX forums:

Q: What type of gas should I use in the Fury?

A: Owner's Manual says 86 octane (U.S. Rating), use as close as you can to this! DO NOT USE 91 OR 93 OR WHATEVER TYPE OF OCTANE GAS THAT YOU THINK THAT IS RIGHT FOR THE BIKE (INSIDE U.S.) , THE MANUFACTURER'S OF THIS BIKE HAVE MORE MECHANICAL KNOWLEDGE OF THIS BIKE THAN YOU DO! Facts Thread:
I too believe that..."THE MANUFACTURER'S OF THIS BIKE HAVE MORE MECHANICAL KNOWLEDGE OF THIS BIKE "

Which is why I simply stated what was in my printed manual before I illustrated my own procedure.

My manual states clearly...."Use 86 octane rating or higher."
 

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I too believe that..."THE MANUFACTURER'S OF THIS BIKE HAVE MORE MECHANICAL KNOWLEDGE OF THIS BIKE "

Which is why I simply stated what was in my printed manual before I illustrated my own procedure.

My manual states clearly...."Use 86 octane rating or higher."
Wasn't trying to correct you, was just trying to get the facts out there and as you can see, there is confusion on the subject... that is all I was stating bro :D I too ran higher octane in my bike when I first got it, but after I realized I might be doing more damage to my bike, I quickly switched to 87 octane about 8 -10 months ago and haven't looked back since.
 

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Never heard of damage except to your wallet on running higher octane than suggested.
I will ask my product engineer today about damage issue,head, rings lining of cyclinder, rod and fuel system, he does this for our company for a living so he is gold!
Im glad I sell mainly diesel motors and heavy duty purpose built chassis
You learn new stuff everyday; BUT I know for a fact the inverse is true, High compression engine will run terrible and stop running after to a long time using low octane fuel, I KNOW cause I PAID FOR THE EDUCATION at the BMW SHOP class was $350.00 I never forget when I PAY.:D:D
 

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There is absolutely nothing to be gained by running a higher-octane fuel than that which the engine manufacturer has tested and specified. The petrol refineries all start with the same basic raw fuel formulation (it's called "white gas"), and then mix-in the additive package, including the octane booster, that is appropriate to the grade specification being produced. The additive package can vary seasonally, by region, and can also include brand-specific components, such as TCP, but in all cases is required to meet the minimum octane number specified for the grade. Taken to the extreme, using very-high octane fuel (130-145 avgas, for instance) can actually reduce engine performance by "slowing-down" the normal combustion process excessively. Putting high-octane fuel in your relatively low-performance, stock, Fury engine is a waste of money; but go ahead and do it if it makes you feel good, after all, riding a Fury is all about feelin' good, isn't it? My two-bits............

Cheers
 

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RSS your Some what wrong in the breakdown you provided. With most commercially built engines going beyond rated octane level is OK, but they are tuned for optimal performance with the octane stated and are built to take a variety of different applications.

By increasing the octane rating 8/10 times you just waste money, 1/10 times you get slightly better performance, and the other 1/10 times you do damage to the engine.

pfeifler85, You should try sticking near 87 octane though. The tuning differences (Timing, cam duration, fuel pressure) currently can not be adjusted to accomidate fuel changes. The bike was designed for 86 as the manual says so the minor differences in performance are accounted for and you are probably just wasting money

This Describes the Octane rating system Octane Ratings – Premium vs Regular Gas: What’s The Difference? you can also check some other sites as well
 
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