Honda Fury Forums: banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
6. Have to pull the whole PAIR solenoid and its hoses out of the way to get room to work on the valves. Ignoring the manual, I left the electrical connector connected to the PAIR solenoid (I could see it would be a real pain to try and reconnect it later), I pulled the assembly back by the tubes connecting to the front cylinder and then tied them off on the frame to hold it there.

7. Mechanics heaven: access to the rear intake valves. Both valves checked out at just slightly over 0.006 inches so I leave them alone. The tank only really has to be out of the way for this set of valves, so to avoid a heartbreaking mishap (if I manage to knock the tank off the step ladder, it would be very sad), I put the PAIR valves and hoses back and rebolt the gas tank into place.

8. Get to the rear exhaust valve. That valve cover is the exact same valve cover that they used on my first bike: a 1973 Honda CB350G ! The exhaust valve is slightly tight so I adjust it to be just a bit on the loose side of 0.012 inches. Happily, the adjusting screw doesn't want to move much (if at all) when loosening or tightening the locking nut. Also, the threads seem to be pretty fine, so a surgical touch is not required to get the setting right (unlike my old CB350G in which setting the valves could involve many adjustments and readjustments as the mechanism was finicky. Eventually you got a feel for how much EXTRA to make the valve loose to compensate for it tightening up AS you're cinching down the lock nut, arghh !! ).


9. Access to the front valves is a piece of cake, there's nothing in the way (in fact, the manual shows how you can do a complete top end rebuild of the front cylinder without removing the engine from the frame. The front intake valves were fine, and the exhaust valve was slightly tight, so I adjust it so that it is slightly loose.

10. All done. A look at the exposed plumbing around the cylinder heads when the covers are off. The Honda engineers and designers sure did some work to hide it all and get us such a clean looking engine.


Now I can just cruise on the valves 'till 8000 miles comes a callin'.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
good writeup..i found for me removing the tank was super easy after running most of the gas out the day before...just tip the back of the tank up so remaining gas runs to front...i personally see no need to take filter housing off although i removed pair solenoid...the electrical connector simply snaps right in...i found one intake valve fine at .007 ; one intake out of spec at .004 and the rest still in spec at .001 under so i adjusted all but the one to .001 over so all are at high end of spec....all in all not a difficult job but see why dealers need to charge what some do if they actually do it right
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
good writeup..i found for me removing the tank was super easy after running most of the gas out the day before...just tip the back of the tank up so remaining gas runs to front...i personally see no need to take filter housing off although i removed pair solenoid...the electrical connector simply snaps right in...i found one intake valve fine at .007 ; one intake out of spec at .004 and the rest still in spec at .001 under so i adjusted all but the one to .001 over so all are at high end of spec....all in all not a difficult job but see why dealers need to charge what some do if they actually do it right
I wanted to do it myself as I am a mechanic by trade but they told me if I wanted to keep my warranty I had to let them do it! Sucks cause I never trust anyone with my scoot except myself! It's like someone else putting their hands on your wife sorta speak!LOL!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I wanted to do it myself as I am a mechanic by trade but they told me if I wanted to keep my warranty I had to let them do it! Sucks cause I never trust anyone with my scoot except myself! It's like someone else putting their hands on your wife sorta speak!LOL!
All, thanks for the tip about leaving the air cleaner in place. I wondered about that later and will try leaving the air cleaner alone next time. Some of those hoses are hard to pull off, I'm thinking of the ones attached to the starboard side of the PAIR solenoid (after the wire retainers are moved, of course !). Anyone have tip for easily removing hoses, I was thinking of what tool one could use to make it easier.

The electrical connector to the PAIR solenoid on my bike was really held in tight by the sharp angle of the wires. There was not a lot of slack there to pull the connector off ! I decided not to disconnect for that reason.

That sucks about the Canadian Warranty requirements. In U.S. law, the manufacturers CANNOT require a person to use the services of a dealership or professional shop in order to maintain the warranty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
instead of removing them from the solenoid itself i removed them at the other locations and pulled the whole thing out the left side...when putting them back on i always put a dab of armorall inside the hose ends and they slip back on real easy and hopefully easier off next time around
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
checked the valves, only took 2 1/2 hrs. a couple were a little out, no biggie. saved myself $250-$300, and got some hands on experience :) thx for the write-up:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Glad that you found that useful. There's nothing like DIY to know that the valves are set to spec and to have peace of mind (and $$ in pocket).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I wanted to do it myself as I am a mechanic by trade but they told me if I wanted to keep my warranty I had to let them do it! Sucks cause I never trust anyone with my scoot except myself! It's like someone else putting their hands on your wife sorta speak!LOL!
May want to check around on that....I don't think they can force you to let them have exclusive rights to working on your bike.
 

·
Septuagenarian Rider
Joined
·
4,151 Posts
Warranty

I wanted to do it myself as I am a mechanic by trade but they told me if I wanted to keep my warranty I had to let them do it!
Not true I believe but verify with Honda Canada customer relations Toll Free 1-888-9-HONDA-9 (1-888-946-6329). As a licensed mechanic and/or ASE certified Master Technician (or not) all you should need is to retain receipts for any parts used in the service or repair of your vehicle. Although not required, possession of the factory service manual $60US is further validation of use of factory recommended procedures should you later request related warranty work and a dealer challenges your competency. Normally, warranty cannot be refused unless prior related negligence can be demonstrated.

Should you need warranty work done you will be required to let an authorized Honda dealer perform the work if you want Honda to pay for it, which in the bigger picture is fair play. Theoretically your Honda dealer has all the latest service bulletins, factory training and support which you do not normally have access to. The exception to that rule is accessibility; i.e. if you are too far away and do not have reasonable access to a dealer such as when travelling (this should be explained in your warranty agreement). Again, save all receipts and be prepared to prove competency of the repairer if you are planning to ask Honda for reimbursement.

As a final note you should carefully read the terms of your warranty agreement supplied with the purchase of your new Fury (something very few owners do). When warranty repair is refused it is normally because of an exclusion stated in this document.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top