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My buddy has a 2012 Fury that's essentially proven to be a lemon since he bought it. Been dead more than its been ridden. The starter was the first thing replaced, which was done professionally. He went through 2 new batteries last season.
Somethings got to be pulling a charge from his battery even while the bike is off, right? Could anything else kill batteries that quickly? Could a short somewhere do that?

There was an after market GPS installed when he bought the bike that he's since taken off, though I believe the wiring connection remains.
It also has after market LED turn signals and I believe break light.

We're both new riders, started together 2 years ago and have no experience with wrenching bikes except watching his hauled off to a mechanic.

Any advice or guidance you can give me to help him get on the road this season?
Would a good first step be buying a multimeter and checking the battery after a new one is installed?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Yes get yourself a multimeter and check the power drain while the bike is off. Use the amps/milliamps setting and wire it in series with the positive lead. Ideally the current drain when the bike is off is 0 amps. You should also check that the battery is charging. Start the bike and put the meter across the battery while the bike is idling, you should see 14V or higher. Also it is worth investing in a battery charger-maintainer. NoCo and Ctek make excellent products, make sure you buy one that works with lithium batteries as sooner or later you will end up with a lithium battery in the bike.
 

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I'd also recommend getting the battery load tested. A battery can show full voltage, but fail under load and not deliver enough CCA to start the bike. The OE battery really is kind of shitty. And a 2012? If it is the original, that is a 10-11 year old battery. If it really does have a drain on it, when full, park it, pull all the fuses. Put one in and let it sit. If it died, on a good battery mind you, that circuit has your drain. Repeat for every circuit. Good place to start looking is the wiring for any add-on. If the GPS is gone, take the wiring out, and make sure the harness is in good condition after you do that, etc
 

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2011 Fury -Burgundy Lightening is a non-abs American bike-
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My buddy has a 2012 Fury that's essentially proven to be a lemon since he bought it. Been dead more than its been ridden. The starter was the first thing replaced, which was done professionally. He went through 2 new batteries last season.
Somethings got to be pulling a charge from his battery even while the bike is off, right? Could anything else kill batteries that quickly? Could a short somewhere do that?

There was an after market GPS installed when he bought the bike that he's since taken off, though I believe the wiring connection remains.
It also has after market LED turn signals and I believe break light.

We're both new riders, started together 2 years ago and have no experience with wrenching bikes except watching his hauled off to a mechanic.

Any advice or guidance you can give me to help him get on the road this season?
Would a good first step be buying a multimeter and checking the battery after a new one is installed?

Thanks in advance.
 

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There are relatively few multimeters in the DIY range that will measure dc current. I found one on Amazon and now have 2 of them. You would disconnect (for example) the negative batt cable, and connect the multimeter between the disconnected cable and the battery terminal. This will tell you the current draw, just make sure the key is off. The multimeter cables will not handle much current (no more than one amp). Hope it's ok to post a link to the meter...
 

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There are relatively few multimeters in the DIY range that will measure dc current. I found one on Amazon and now have 2 of them. You would disconnect (for example) the negative batt cable, and connect the multimeter between the disconnected cable and the battery terminal. This will tell you the current draw, just make sure the key is off. The multimeter cables will not handle much current (no more than one amp). Hope it's ok to post a link to the meter...
Yeah links are all good and encouraged! Helps people find products they otherwise may not have known existed. When I do tech write-ups if there's any special tooling needed or just something that makes life easier, I always try and post links, so thanks for that!
 
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I use this for current. Saves having to do in in series measurement, making sure your leads can handle the current etc. Quick and easy. There are probably cheaper ones out there, but I always buy Fluke

 

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I use this for current. Saves having to do in in series measurement, making sure your leads can handle the current etc. Quick and easy. There are probably cheaper ones out there, but I always buy Fluke

You can't go wrong with a Fluke. I still have and use a digital Fluke multimeter that I bought when I was in university back in 1978 (so that makes it about 44 years old). Digital readout multimeters were "new" back then, cost me $160 which was a lot of money but it's lasted and it will probably get passed down to my son when I kick the bucket.
 
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