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Septuagenarian Rider
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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Honda Fury 'Regular' Fuel Requirement

Higher octane fuel burns slower, but has more energy, but in that respect, are far more conducive to higher-compression engines. (less likely to burn well under low compression)
As SirGCal points out there is a lot of incomplete info regarding premium fuel. Detonation occurs after spark ignition when fuel burns too quickly spiking the combustion pressure instead of building a steady increase. This excessively rapid pressure rise while the crank pin is still at a high angle (harder to turn) and before the piston is far enough down it's stroke to absorb the energy is often referred to and heard as "pinging".

Advertised compression ratio is NOT the issue here because it is only theoretical (the ratio of swept cylinder + combustion chamber volume to combustion chamber volume). It does not reflect actual "dynamic" compression pressures which are controlled by a number of factors including valve timing (intake valve is open when piston is at the bottom or beginning of the "compression stroke"), intake air-fuel charge velocity and ignition timing (spark occurs before piston reaches top of "compression stroke"). Crankshaft rotation with valves closed before ignition can be as little as half the 180° rotation of the crank pin from BDC to TDC on a high performance four stroke engine. Although this sounds very inefficient consider that at the bottom of the stroke the connecting rod and crank pin have similar arcs resulting in limited piston movement while at the top of the stroke the arcs are opposing resulting in more rapid piston movement. This is why typical cam/valve timing (degrees of rotation) shows more than twice the valve overlap (int & ex valves open at the same time) at the bottom of the stroke than at the top.

Although not relevant to the Fury and larger V-twin engines, high revving motorcycle engines often list very high compression ratios but also have more radical cam/valve timing and faster moving pistons (less time for detonation pressure spikes) so that dynamic compression is balanced to regular fuel requirements. The Fury/VTX 1300 engine develops its power at lower rotational speed similar to large displacement car engines and yields similar power and torque curves.

High octane fuel has lower volatility and therefore burns slower (SirGCal) reducing combustion pressure spikes (detonation). Regular fuel required by the Fury is more volatile and burns faster, so, because our engines have low dynamic compression they can take the faster push (burn) without detonation (absence of pinging). Theoretically you will get more power and better gas mileage, although not both at the same time :rolleyes:.
 

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Just run what the owner manual tells you to run, which is the cheap stuff.
 

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Will having fuel computers, i.e. Fi2000, etc be able to handle regular gas? IMO is seems like it shouldn't be an issue because none these except PC5 advances timing. Right?
 

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Septuagenarian Rider
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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)

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Bruin, on your pc5, did you Dyno tune it and advance the timing? Or just plug & play? If you get a knock then step up your gas to higher octane. If you haven't noticed any problems, stick with 87, as Gar stated.


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Septuagenarian Rider
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Discussion Starter #16
Good point 2Dirty. It wasn't clear which of the 3 bruin has from the link he provided. I guess he expects me to do all his homework for him :rolleyes: because this time I put the Fury in the selector and it seems the variable ignition timing model is the only one available to him. With that unit all bets are off on fuel grade recommendations. Dangerous territory for an non techy :(.
 

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Yeah, your gonna end up with a leaky head gasket spewing oil and be all pissed when you get grief over the warranty...

Ok, could not resist, shame on me. :)

Vic
 

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Good reading :) Will save you money and grief some day ;)
Gar,i am useing 90 oct with no etho in it 90% of the time.Ihave checked my fuel pump twice and no residue in it.From what i can tell the 90 oct dosen't hurt it.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Gar,i am useing 90 oct with no etho in it 90% of the time.Ihave checked my fuel pump twice and no residue in it.From what i can tell the 90 oct dosen't hurt it.
Like the good book says Bill ... 86 or higher :). Theoretically, the higher in octane you go above what you need the less energy is available at optimum crank angle due to the slower burning. Not likely we'd notice though :rolleyes:. Who knows, maybe premium would give me more power since I'm a plodder :p seldom above 3000 rpm :eek:. Lots of time to burn and time to kill :D.
 

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Like the good book says Bill ... 86 or higher :). Theoretically, the higher in octane you go above what you need the less energy is available at optimum crank angle due to the slower burning. Not likely we'd notice though :rolleyes:. Who knows, maybe premium would give me more power since I'm a plodder :p seldom above 2500 rpm :eek:. Lots of time to burn and time to kill :D.
Could be the reason im getting 50/52 to the gallon.
 
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