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2015 Fury, appx. 8000 miles. Lived in Arizona most of it's life. located to Florida about a year ago.
Amazing how quickly the corrosion is starting, I know the plating now days is not what it use to be, but this is wild. The biggest surprise is the upper motor mount. Maybe due to the heat generated in the area? I will probably remove the mount, sand blast it and have it powder coated in the near future. As for the corroding chrome, I think I will leave it!
Anyone else operating in a high salt laden environment having same results? Suggestions as to treatment to slow it down?
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I don’t get much at all where I am apart from where rain can sit in parts around mirrors etc yet I see some pretty damned good removal of it from chrome on YT simply using kitchen alfoil (attraction of molecules science stuff) not that it’s putting the chrome back on of course. In those areas where water can sit I just run a bit of silicon spray into the gaps as it sits there ok without gathering noticeable crap.
 

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Hmm, Rust..... Alec Baldwin is guilty of negligent homicide and should be arrested, charged, tried and sentenced for such....

For those pipes, you could have them ceramic coated (jet-hot is pretty good), to help with corrosion. If it's to preserve the entire part, I'd send it off and have it done as they'll clean up the existing rust. If it's just for looks, then pull the pipes, sand/blast the visible parts, and use a home DIY ceramic coating just where you need it. The other parts, rust removal and powdercoating is a great way to do it. For surfaces that don't have any current rust on them, a wax, or perhaps a polymer-based coating should help keep the salt-laden humid air from accelerating corrosion. Obviously for hot parts, that's not an option, but for frame, and painted tins, it's a pretty decent choice IMO.
 

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I live about 100 metres from the water of Sydney Harbour and I get a lot of salt in the air. The trick to keeping the chrome like new is to keep it clean and don't let a salt film build up on it. In between washing the bike I use ultimate waterless wash and wax by Meguiar's which I find works better than a detail spray and leaves a nice wax behind to protect the chrome.

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I polish my chrome once a month with Nu Finish but any high polymer car polish will be fine. I also keep my bike in the garage under two covers. The first cover is a soft dust and dirt type of cover and the second that goes on over the first is a water resistant rain cover. The covers stop the salt air condensing on the bike.

For your chrome:
Remove the rust with either foil or 0000 steel wool.
Polish with a good non scratch chrome polish such as Killer Chrome Polish from Surf City Garage.
Polish again with a high polymer car polish to protect the chrome.

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In salty environments, we spray the underside of our vehicles with used motor oil...

Seems like I read every alternative here except that.
That's because it's not a Harley forum... 🤣
 
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