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Just thought it would be a cool idea to start a thread of pictures of everyone's helmets.
 

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These are my three best helmets. They are all Icon Alliance models. Everyone knows what an Icon Alliance looks like on the outside. It's what's on the inside that matters since you're gonna be up in that helmet for hours at a time. Guys don't usually show off the inside of their helmets, but that's what's most important.

I only buy used helmets because, right out of the box, they feel custom-made. Sebum conditions helmet padding, keeping it soft and preventing dry rot. As it builds up, sebaceous sweat appears as a yellow or brown protective coating. When I buy a "new" used lid, I always look for that yellow-brown color in the padding. The more, the better.

Of course, sebum is the component of sweat that stinks. So, you've got to get past the smell of another guy's dirty hair and sweaty face. Once you've overcome those preconceived notions about used helmets being like dirty underwear, you'll recognize that smell, not as sweat, but as the new smell of a used lid. As you wear a used lid, the smell will go away, and you'll miss it.

This sweaty helmet smells like dirty hair:
238713


This sweaty helmet smells like musk:
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This sweaty helmet has a light hydrocarbon smell:
238715
 

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Years back I was at Koss World Headquarters (it used to be just down from Harley-Davidson's World Headquarters) and asked why their Studio Pro headphone surrounds break down. They said it was from not removing body oils after wearing them, and even though the amount of oil is small it adds up over time. As it turns out human body oils are pretty hard on most everything, including shirt collars, leather jackets, helmet liners, etc.

People's faces come with loads of bacteria, and sebum (natural body oil) fights off most of it, however some bacteria (particularly Cutibacterium acnes) feed on sebum. Generally it's a good idea to not expose oneself to other's facial bacteria, as the hardest stuff to kill off is what usually survives...

Helmet smell is from mold, bacteria, and fungus, not sebum. Genetically we tend to like things that are good for us and keep us alive (fats, sugars, protein) and dislike things that are bad for us (mold, bacteria, fungus, carrots...).


238748
 

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Years back I was at Koss World Headquarters (it used to be just down from Harley-Davidson's World Headquarters) and asked why their Studio Pro headphone surrounds break down. They said it was from not removing body oils after wearing them, and even though the amount of oil is small it adds up over time. As it turns out human body oils are pretty hard on most everything, including shirt collars, leather jackets, helmet liners, etc.

People's faces come with loads of bacteria, and sebum (natural body oil) fights off most of it, however some bacteria (particularly Cutibacterium acnes) feed on sebum. Generally it's a good idea to not expose oneself to other's facial bacteria, as the hardest stuff to kill off is what usually survives...

Helmet smell is from mold, bacteria, and fungus, not sebum. Genetically we tend to like things that are good for us and keep us alive (fats, sugars, protein) and dislike things that are bad for us (mold, bacteria, fungus, carrots...).
Sebaceous sweat does smell, even with very little bacteria. It's the smell that "dirty hair" gets. I've worn many used lids. Those with yellow or brown sweat stains do stink. Sebum and earwax, while bad for electronics, keep helmet padding soft. When choosing a used lid, sweat color tells you a lot about padding condition. Sure, it's gonna stink, but a well worn lid with yellow and brown sweat stains is super comfortable the first time you get in it.
 

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Sebaceous sweat does smell, even with very little bacteria. It's the smell that "dirty hair" gets. I've worn many used lids. Those with yellow or brown sweat stains do stink. Sebum and earwax, while bad for electronics, keep helmet padding soft. When choosing a used lid, sweat color tells you a lot about padding condition. Sure, it's gonna stink, but a well worn lid with yellow and brown sweat stains is super comfortable the first time you get in it.
Interesting that this is the direction you went on your first posts here :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::sick:. You'll blend right in
 

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Before retiring my last 18 1/2 years of employment was spent with Honda Manufacturing in the paint shop. They went to incredible lengths to make sure no bare skin touched the body after e-coat and before paint.
Oils of any kind reduce the adhesion of enamel (paint). It's very much like copper-enamel, if you've ever done that. You've got to make sure that the copper is untouched by human hands before applying enamel powders and firing. Otherwise, the enamel won't stick to the copper surface.
 

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Here's a set of insights as to helmet smell:

Synopsis: A "third odor" distinctive to men in their 30s and 40s is from diacetyl included in their sweat, which smells like old, used oil and is mainly generated from the back and crown of the head. Although men have difficulty noticing this odor themselves, women notice it easily as it has the characteristic of being unpleasant. A well-balanced diet can help. And stay clean.

To help keep the helmet smelling fresh, use an Anti-Bacterial spray and wear a do-rag. Wash the do-rag frequently.
 

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Here's a set of insights as to helmet smell:

Synopsis: A "third odor" distinctive to men in their 30s and 40s is from diacetyl included in their sweat, which smells like old, used oil and is mainly generated from the back and crown of the head. Although men have difficulty noticing this odor themselves, women notice it easily as it has the characteristic of being unpleasant. A well-balanced diet can help. And stay clean.

To help keep the helmet smelling fresh, use an Anti-Bacterial spray and wear a do-rag. Wash the do-rag frequently.
The "third odor" has a color: brownish yellow. It's very natural, and once you've been in it for a while, you don't even notice. The hard part is getting in the first time. If it bothers you, put it on without looking. The smell will also go away when air starts to flow through the lid as you ride in it. The only time you might notice is when you're at a stop. It's not a big deal, though.
 

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