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Welcome to the forum, it's a great group of close-knit friends, so expect the harmless ribbing that goes with it, and a lot of help when/if you need it.

You have a solid plan, most Fury owners I've met keep the machines in great shape. Change out the final drive oil with the engine oil, change all the fluids according to the service intervals, and it should last over 100,000 miles without even a clutch change.

There are very few mechanical problems with Furys in general, the few that exist are well-documented here and relatively easy to rectify at home. It's really cheap to own (until you start modifying it, though that's any bike).

Unlike a sportbike the Fury doesn't put weight on your wrists, though probably will strengthen your abs if you sit in a clam-shell position (given your height that's probably the case on a stock bike and would probably be easier on your back anyway).

As @Ordinary Biker said, the biggest issue is the length; on one hand the weight is low which makes the bike stable, on the other there's not much ground clearance and scraping a peg and the exhaust in right-hand turns is common on a stock bike. It "turns funny" and the manual clutch is a bit stiff, but you'll get used to it. Other than that it's easy to drive.

If you lower it, put a fat rear tire on, stretch the forks out even more, it becomes harder to manage corners--though with all three things taken to the extreme the bike can still do a "tight" U-turn at 1 MPH with an experienced rider. If you want a bike with a great support network that you can do as much or as little to as you want and still turn heads, the Fury is it.

There are affordable and relatively-easy-to-install aftermarket and Do-It-Yourself air suspensions that will lower the bike, and if needed the seat can be changed for thinner seats (though I don't suggest that).

For many the Fury doesn't "get old." Of all the bikes a person may own, it usually remains a favorite.
 

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Yellow tends to look bigger, gray smaller, blue longer, but the stock geometry is all the same (there are very few changes on the Fury since being introduced in 2009). Tire size and suspension settings might differ. AJ started a thread on this, it was expanded to include basic information about the bike including pictures of every model year.

How tall a person is doesn't matter as much as their inseam does (long legs vs short legs) and how wide of a stance is required (thin bikes let your legs reach the ground more easily). The seat height can be changed a number of ways, though it's pretty low to start with. The wide handlebars and reach are interesting, but comfortable.
 
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