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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here it is all...finally done. Still got the black spike intake coming later this week/next week sometime; will post up after that too.









 

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Here it is all...finally done. Still got the black spike intake coming later this week/next week sometime; will post up after that too.
Looking good bro! Keep it up, like the little touches on the turn sig and headlight too...
 

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Looks Awesome!!! Can you list the steps you used on the headlight, like what grit sandpaper you used initially and in between coats?
 

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Paint application

Any chance you could give us a rundown on how and what you used to paint the forks and headlight assy. I think a lot of people on here would jump all over this look. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Instructions

Sorry for not posting tips/pointers initially, kinda a duh' thing now that I think about it LOL. Well lets see, I used a slightly different method for smoking the stock blinkers as compared to painting the other pieces, so here's what I did. Just a side note too...I am not a painter by trade, I'm a desk jockey in the Air Force, so these are likely small improvement type jobs that most anyone can do on their own.

TURN SIGNAL LENSE
I just did a search for how to do this...so here's a link to shoot you in the right direction Lexus LS400: How to Smoke/Tint Tail Lights

PAINTING SIDE PANEL, HEADLIGHT, FORKS

I don't take the same method used by pro painters when painting auto pieces, primarily just because it turns out better for me when doing it my way. I start out with 800 grit sand paper and wet sand the pieces first...the trick is to keep the paper really wet and try not to spend too much time in one place; if you score it too deep you will wind up with dimples in the part. After you've got it scored completely, take and wash the part with soapy water then rinse clean. Next you need to dry the part completely...any wet spots left on the part prior to paint will not turn out properly. Once you get it dry take a clean rag/paper towel and pour some rubbing alcohol on it, now rub the part down with the alcohol soaked rag until you've covered/cleansed every inch of it. All this does is ensure that you've got all grease/oil type products (even your greasy finger prints) off the part, again this will just make the paint hold that much better. From here you can either let the alcohol dry on it's own, or dry it with another towel/etc...don't leave any lint behind to paint over though. My method is that aside from using the 800 grit sand paper to begin with, I won't use any more unless required; if for some reason the paint begins to pit or run, I'll let it dry completely and use 2000 grit paper to smooth it back out, but I don't plan to use any sand paper between coats. I bought RUST-O-LEAM Paint for Plastic (Gloss Black) from Advanced Auto Parts for the color, and any clear coat paint for autos. I found that the gloss black tends to pit and create an orange peal effect when used alone, so I mix the clear in to the process to create the smooth effect, then cap the top layer off with the gloss black.

Supplies (for all parts at one time)
- 6 cans gloss black Rust-O-Leam Paint for Plastic
- 6 cans for automobile Clear Coat Acrylic paint
- A pack of 800 grit sand paper
- Plastic sheeting (cover your bike when doing the forks)
- Masking tape
- Rubbing Alcohol
- 2000 grit sand paper (for turn signals and corrections on other parts as needed)
- And assorted tools for removing wheel/parts

So...
- Wet sand the part (800 grit)
- Clean with soap and water, then dry
- Clean with rubbing alcohol, then let air dry or dry with towel
- Apply 1st coat of gloss black paint...don't over do it at the start; better light initially; let dry 5-10mins
- Apply 2nd coat of gloss black paint...a good indication to stop on this coat is when all chrome has gone; let dry 5-10mins
....here you can move on to the clear (you should see an orange peal effect already with the gloss black) to smooth the paint out (not sure why, but 3 coats of clear tends to make the part silky smooth), but I usually throw one more coat of gloss black on it
- Apply 3 coats of clear now...you can be a little more liberal with the clear, but don't go overboard; you don't want it to run; wait 5-10mins between coats
...following the clear coat application your part will be very smooth, however it will not be as shiny as the gloss black is, that is why I finish the process with another coat or two of the gloss black
- Apply 1 coat of gloss black, ensure you cover the entire part, but keep the layer as thin as you can...the more you put on the better chance of creating the pitting you corrected earlier; allow to dry 10-20mins
...check your part and see if the part is glossy like the rest of the bike, if not, you need to go with another coat; repeat the last step, but remember to try and keep the coat of gloss black as thin as you can

Once finished...DO NOT touch the part for at least 10-12 hours, it takes a while for all those coats to dry; if you get in a rush and try to get the part on too quickly, you WILL leave finger prints...trust me, I know:mad:

As for hanging the part, I just used fishing line and tried to anchor it from somewhere that didn't show on the part; make sure your line isn't going to touch any painted piece of the part either, because if the wind blows or it sways it will ruin your hard work.

Well I hope this helps...I know it seems like a lot, but it's not too difficult. The biggest thing is taking the time to do it all, it's something that will take up the better part of your day, so plan ahead.
 

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Sorry for not posting tips/pointers initially, kinda a duh' thing now that I think about it LOL. Well lets see, I used a slightly different method for smoking the stock blinkers as compared to painting the other pieces, so here's what I did. Just a side note too...I am not a painter by trade, I'm a desk jockey in the Air Force, so these are likely small improvement type jobs that most anyone can do on their own.

TURN SIGNAL LENSE
I just did a search for how to do this...so here's a link to shoot you in the right direction Lexus LS400: How to Smoke/Tint Tail Lights

PAINTING SIDE PANEL, HEADLIGHT, FORKS

I don't take the same method used by pro painters when painting auto pieces, primarily just because it turns out better for me when doing it my way. I start out with 800 grit sand paper and wet sand the pieces first...the trick is to keep the paper really wet and try not to spend too much time in one place; if you score it too deep you will wind up with dimples in the part. After you've got it scored completely, take and wash the part with soapy water then rinse clean. Next you need to dry the part completely...any wet spots left on the part prior to paint will not turn out properly. Once you get it dry take a clean rag/paper towel and pour some rubbing alcohol on it, now rub the part down with the alcohol soaked rag until you've covered/cleansed every inch of it. All this does is ensure that you've got all grease/oil type products (even your greasy finger prints) off the part, again this will just make the paint hold that much better. From here you can either let the alcohol dry on it's own, or dry it with another towel/etc...don't leave any lint behind to paint over though. My method is that aside from using the 800 grit sand paper to begin with, I won't use any more unless required; if for some reason the paint begins to pit or run, I'll let it dry completely and use 2000 grit paper to smooth it back out, but I don't plan to use any sand paper between coats. I bought RUST-O-LEAM Paint for Plastic (Gloss Black) from Advanced Auto Parts for the color, and any clear coat paint for autos. I found that the gloss black tends to pit and create an orange peal effect when used alone, so I mix the clear in to the process to create the smooth effect, then cap the top layer off with the gloss black.

Supplies (for all parts at one time)
- 6 cans gloss black Rust-O-Leam Paint for Plastic
- 6 cans for automobile Clear Coat Acrylic paint
- A pack of 800 grit sand paper
- Plastic sheeting (cover your bike when doing the forks)
- Masking tape
- Rubbing Alcohol
- 2000 grit sand paper (for turn signals and corrections on other parts as needed)
- And assorted tools for removing wheel/parts

So...
- Wet sand the part (800 grit)
- Clean with soap and water, then dry
- Clean with rubbing alcohol, then let air dry or dry with towel
- Apply 1st coat of gloss black paint...don't over do it at the start; better light initially; let dry 5-10mins
- Apply 2nd coat of gloss black paint...a good indication to stop on this coat is when all chrome has gone; let dry 5-10mins
....here you can move on to the clear (you should see an orange peal effect already with the gloss black) to smooth the paint out (not sure why, but 3 coats of clear tends to make the part silky smooth), but I usually throw one more coat of gloss black on it
- Apply 3 coats of clear now...you can be a little more liberal with the clear, but don't go overboard; you don't want it to run; wait 5-10mins between coats
...following the clear coat application your part will be very smooth, however it will not be as shiny as the gloss black is, that is why I finish the process with another coat or two of the gloss black
- Apply 1 coat of gloss black, ensure you cover the entire part, but keep the layer as thin as you can...the more you put on the better chance of creating the pitting you corrected earlier; allow to dry 10-20mins
...check your part and see if the part is glossy like the rest of the bike, if not, you need to go with another coat; repeat the last step, but remember to try and keep the coat of gloss black as thin as you can

Once finished...DO NOT touch the part for at least 10-12 hours, it takes a while for all those coats to dry; if you get in a rush and try to get the part on too quickly, you WILL leave finger prints...trust me, I know:mad:

As for hanging the part, I just used fishing line and tried to anchor it from somewhere that didn't show on the part; make sure your line isn't going to touch any painted piece of the part either, because if the wind blows or it sways it will ruin your hard work.

Well I hope this helps...I know it seems like a lot, but it's not too difficult. The biggest thing is taking the time to do it all, it's something that will take up the better part of your day, so plan ahead.

Cant wait to watch you paint my side panels when I get home, hehe!!:D For real though, good info man, ill use this when i paint mine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Posted some pics to the gallery for you Rtrombone, or should I call you Tom Cruise LOL (profile pic)...that dance he did at the end of Tropic Thunder was hilarious!
 

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Posted some pics to the gallery for you Rtrombone, or should I call you Tom Cruise LOL (profile pic)...that dance he did at the end of Tropic Thunder was hilarious!

Hey man, have you seen the Black Fury on the gallery with the rims and rear end painted black? It would look awesome on yours with everything you have done...
 

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Looks great. Since everyone else is adding their ideas, I'll throw mine in also. Have you thought about a chrome trim piece for the fenders. I think it would match well with the look of the headlight. I also think black powder coat for the pipes would be nice. I want to drop my bike over so you can start on it next :).
 

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Posted some pics to the gallery for you Rtrombone, or should I call you Tom Cruise LOL (profile pic)...that dance he did at the end of Tropic Thunder was hilarious!
Les Grossman is a MAN aming men. LOL - He should have won an academy award for that film lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'd throw these parts if they didn't cost so much....

Well I got my other intake (first didn't work) in the mail today and go to put it on, but like always...something didn't add up. The bolts were way too short to go through all the plates and adapter, so like a good little boy I hopped in the car and drove 15mins to Lowes for longer bolts. I get back home and guess what, those don't work either. After 30mins of trying every variation of piecing this thing together tonight I finally gave up and put the stock intake back on; I'll have to wait later in the week when I have the time/patience to put this da*n intake on.

I swear I wanted to scratch my eyes out before taking the adapter/etc. back off the bike and putting the stock intake back on....this will make for the fourth attempt at getting an aftermarket intake on this bike come later in the week.

My words of wisdom from all this.........................BUY THE LOW AND MEAN COMPLETE ASSEMBLY; save yourself the misery! I tried to cheap out and buy the Accutronix adapter and a generic 3-bolt intake on E-Bay, and have paid for it with sweat and tears ever since. Why the intake and/or the adapter don't come with longer bolts is anyone's guess, but it sure is a pain in the buyers a** trying to hunt down the proper nuts and bolts that should have come with the parts!

To be continued..........................................:mad::mad:
 

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not bad at all.the headlight and forks add a lot to your bike.a set of custom wheels would bring it together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Intake's on now...finally got the right sized bolts thanks to Lowes. The Accutronix Intake Adapter worked really well; it's a nice chrome piece, that really does the trick.

My levers, grips, and mirrors were supposed to be here yesterday, but are MIA in the UPS system; so the company I bought em' from is shipping another box of goodies. Should be here next week I guess.:eek:







 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
LOL...seems like you're insinuating something there Senior Gar. I did throw these photo-shopped pics together the other day....what do you think?



 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
p.s. I only know enough to be dangerous in photoshop and I'd like to know how you layed the black on your cases and fins :confused:.[/QUOTE]

I do all photo-shopping in Microsoft Powerpoint...just copy an image you want to alter via the internet or "My Pictures"/etc., then paste it onto a Powerpoint slide. From there, please see the below pic....



It takes some practice, but the program is pretty forgiving, and you should catch on rather quickly; there's a lot of neat features about Powerpoint that can make for a sweet photo-shop job.

Hope this helps:D
 

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Bike looks awesome man. We are definetly gonna turn some heads with the mods you have done and the ones im going to do. Cant wait to roll some tires down the road next to ya!! 44 days to go!!
 
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