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Discussion Starter #1
Hey there, I’m looking to buy a new bike and I have narrowed to two, one being the Honda fury.
How does the bike perform in corners and windy roads? And does it countersteer? I watched so many videos on YouTube but they are mainly on straight roads and and cornering they do they are not countersteering. I plan on using the bike for my everyday vehicle, I don't own a car
 

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I personally enjoy my Fury on twisty roads. I live in Colorado, so I tend to take it up in the Rocky Mountains on twisty mountain roads quite a bit. I think it is very good in the corners, low center of gravity. You can tend to drag parts doing this, most notable being the factory exhaust. I have an aftermarket exhaust system so I don't do that. But until I replace the pegs with some that have some fold to them, I will drag the pegs from time to time.

Countersteer. Could make quite a post about just this. I am sure that the Fury is capable of it. I don't think it is model specific, I think any motorcycle can. To be honest, I would have to go out and ride, and pay precise attention to how I ride to know if I countersteer. It is something that happens very quickly and is not always conscious. I have had motorcycle safety training, so I am wondering if I just inherited it from that.

You must live somewhere warm if you are going to use a motorcycle for daily driving! One thing you will find I think is that the Fury doesn't have much cargo capacity. People have added saddle bags of difference styles, seat bags, handlebar bags etc. For myself, I tend to simply use a backpack.

If you buy the Fury, you will love it, I think it is a tremendous bike, have been riding mine for going on 4 years now.
 

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As @Ordinary Biker states, putting on aftermarket exhaust (such as Cobra Slip-Ons) and pegs (unscrew the feelers or put on Kuryakyn brand pegs with adapters) solve the dragging issues. It's a "chopper" so cornering clearance is naturally limited.

Counter-steer works like on any other bike, but the Fury is a bit strange to drive at first given how long & low it is. Anything fatter than the stock 200 rear tire and it resists counter-steer and then "falls in" to a turn a bit too much; one gets used to it, starting the turn later into the corner and expecting the bike to cut a sharper turn than otherwise desired. If you stick with the stock tires and keep them aired up it just takes getting used to.

There is wind blast somewhat blocked by the tank. It's a thin, naked bike, so you'll catch a lot of wind.

It's a highly addictive bike once a person gets used to it, affordable to buy, own, maintain, and very reliable. There's not a lot of market for it either, so you'll have something unique. Honda hasn't changed the core design since introduction, so parts are common to all models and readily available, though aftermarket parts are very limited.

One can use a backpack that rests on the tiny portion of the seat that sticks out behind the driver for daily driving, or put on the OEM passenger seat to support a larger backpack for longer trips.
 

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I find it a very easy bike to ride, very well balanced. I've got a 240 rear tire, but again find it easy to countersteer in the curves. Immediately started going through curves faster than my previous bikes. I also find it less affected by cross-winds than other bikes since it is so open. It does take a little more attention or practice at slow speeds because of its length.
I have 31,000 miles on mine, have had a number of other bikes, but the Fury has been my best riding bike; a good balance of power, handling and looks imho.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for all the answers, I meant to ask last night but posted when I was too tired, how do the foot controls feel? I prefer mid mounts and from what I can see although they are forwards the stance of the rider almost looks like mid mounted
 

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The riding position is very foot forward, body leaned back position. It fits with the whole chopper styling. My bobber has a much more 'standard' riding position with the pegs closer to being under you. I personally find both to be fairly comfortable. More so than the standard 'crotch rocket' style bike where you are more leaned forward with weight on your wrists.

One thing I will add is that some people with delicate posteriors have complained about the seat being uncomfortable. There are replacement options. Personally I can do a whole tank of gas, and by the time I need to refill, my ass is ready for a break. I am far more upset about the fuel load being so small, it is my one complaint about the bike...
 

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Shifting has to be done with conviction (it's a chopper thing).

The rear brake reacts well on the non-ABS bike. It's possible to lock up the front & rear wheels, but on hot pavement it takes intention to do so. The non-hydraulic clutch has a firm pull, it will build up the muscles in the left hand to match the right if you're right-handed, especially in city traffic. I find the throttle gets a bit tiring and benefits from Kuryakyn grips and throttle boss.

I find the stock seat the best for me, though most disagree. The OEM passenger pillion, on the other hand, is like a cement diskus and certainly not friendly.
 

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What is the other bike you're considering?

I think that counter steering is pretty much an every-street-bike thing, so yes.

I'm one season and 1,400 miles into the Fury and really like it. When I was test driving one, within seconds I was surprised and amazed how normal it felt. Larger turning radius, yes, and it is a little different in tight spaces at slow speed, but not a big deal. In a word, I would say driving it is fun.

And it is also fun to go out to the parking lot or the garage and admire it and say, hey that is a cool bike, and it's mine!

Oh, and if you don't like questions and compliments and attention, this might not be the bike for you.
 

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My 2013 has been ridden daily since purchased in 2015. Motorcycles are my only form of transportation.
It performs well on curvy roads although the tighter and smaller they get will slosh the brain painfully. Maneuvering a 665 pound bike left to right quickly will do that. It will do it perfectly. The question after the first time is, is it suited for this? I have a 430 pound sportbike for that. For winding roads, it performs perfectly.
All two wheel vehicles countersteer. Learned it intuitively on my bicycle.
The Fury is designed as the purist form of a chopper that actually works, with none of the design flaws that were a part of the beginning concept.
It's a fun bike to ride. I ignored my high powered sportbike for a year, I was having so much fun riding and touring it everywhere after my daily commute.
I average 45 mpg, have no chain to lube and everyone in my sphere of influence are all asking "where's the chopper" when I ride my sportbike or cruiser.
The riding position is comfortably chopper style.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
What is the other bike you're considering?

I think that counter steering is pretty much an every-street-bike thing, so yes.

I'm one season and 1,400 miles into the Fury and really like it. When I was test driving one, within seconds I was surprised and amazed how normal it felt. Larger turning radius, yes, and it is a little different in tight spaces at slow speed, but not a big deal. In a word, I would say driving it is fun.

And it is also fun to go out to the parking lot or the garage and admire it and say, hey that is a cool bike, and it's mine!

Oh, and if you don't like questions and compliments and attention, this might not be the bike for you.
The other bike is a Ducati Scrambler! There is something about that bike that is just so much fun
I have owned a Honda shadow and a harly dyna, both off them handled really well with countersteering
 

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A few things to consider before buying a Ducati (I was looking at one two years ago):

The initial cost of a "comparable" Ducati (however you want to define that...) will be higher, though there's nothing much out there to compete with the Fury by any manufacturer. (Choppers are not "mass-market popular" currently.)

Ducati insurance will most likely be comparitively higher.

Maintenance costs are usually higher on Ducati models due to design, though the dealer I spoke with said Ducati reliability and service intervals have both increased. The Fury is fairly easy to work on at home and somewhat reasonable at a shop. The Fury valve adjustment is a bit spendy unless you permanently remove the PAIR system, which is a bunch of emissions stuff that's kind of in the way, however Honda has adjustable valves and doesn't require a shim kit (a Ducati shim kit will set you back $185-$285, depending on the type of kit), so the Honda garage mechanic has the advantage.

----
Gossip Section:

I hesitantly say this: While it seemed the local Ducati dealership here abruptly closed permanently last year, and I'd then heard similar stories apply to other Ducati dealerships at the same time, a year later those stories appear kind of fishy because the local dealership seems to have re-opened and I'm not reading similar recent closure reports this year. I hesitantly say "look into this" because I'm unsure of what really happened, and if Ducati is having financial or dealership problems that could be an issue. It could also be a few Ducati dealerships fell on hard times due to lower motorcycle industry sales numbers overall, and this is nothing much to worry about.



I also heard-and again, it's just hearsay-that as of last year there were only two Ducati Certified Master Factory Mechanics left in the U.S., and Ducati was having some internal issues in that area. I don't know the whole story on this and hope Ducati is doing well.

2018 was an admittedly rough year on dealerships.

Something else I note though, Ducati hasn't been selling a lot of bikes in general--about 55,000 total per year, 9,000 in the U.S., which was their #1 market. Honda sells about 275,000 street bikes a year--in North America, around 80,000 in the US. Comparatively, Ducati parts are most likely going to be more costly and harder to get. If the demand for smaller engine sizes continues, Ducati sales will probably continue to fall.
 

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1. it's a Honda will last a long time 2. she's like a Cadillac not a rocket bike not really nimble 3. factory pegs bump on severe cornering I changed to bicycle style lowered my rear a bit and increased rake/length she feels nice in the wind 4. a small fly screen shield helped quite a bit with wind in my face. As the one rider stated try one but nothing showed me more of her capabilities than her first long run from L.A to Reno before all my mods. She may not be a bagger or Goldwing but she turns heads none the less. I made my decision to buy at mid-cities motorsports paramount ca. when I saw a group of guys ride up each with moderately modified Fury I had come to look at a Harley they had but knew a Honda would be less up keep and I grew up with chopper style anyway. Cheers!
 

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I see a lot of opinions which is normal. Here are mine. I started riding in 1965 and I've ridden a lot of different bikes and my Fury has been my favorite. My Shadow Spirit had 85,000 miles when I sold it and my GoldWing had 50k when I traded it for my 2015 Fury. I've ridden it daily to work plus weekend short trips. It handles great. 100-120 miles per tank and I'm ready to stretch anyway. Anticipating a long ride in my future I'm making a few mods. The stock exhaust is gone as is the air intake and fuel management system. A mustang seat and sissy bar. My 12" mini-apes arrived yesterday and that should do it. My long ride? I plan to leave Las Vegas, head up yo see Oregon, then head east to visit some cousins in Maine then home. A backpack, a bag on sissy bar (maybe front and back side) and I'm off.
 

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I see a lot of opinions which is normal. Here are mine. I started riding in 1965 and I've ridden a lot of different bikes and my Fury has been my favorite. My Shadow Spirit had 85,000 miles when I sold it and my GoldWing had 50k when I traded it for my 2015 Fury. I've ridden it daily to work plus weekend short trips. It handles great. 100-120 miles per tank and I'm ready to stretch anyway. Anticipating a long ride in my future I'm making a few mods. The stock exhaust is gone as is the air intake and fuel management system. A mustang seat and sissy bar. My 12" mini-apes arrived yesterday and that should do it. My long ride? I plan to leave Las Vegas, head up yo see Oregon, then head east to visit some cousins in Maine then home. A backpack, a bag on sissy bar (maybe front and back side) and I'm off.
 

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I see a lot of opinions which is normal. Here are mine. I started riding in 1965 and I've ridden a lot of different bikes and my Fury has been my favorite. My Shadow Spirit had 85,000 miles when I sold it and my GoldWing had 50k when I traded it for my 2015 Fury. I've ridden it daily to work plus weekend short trips. It handles great. 100-120 miles per tank and I'm ready to stretch anyway. Anticipating a long ride in my future I'm making a few mods. The stock exhaust is gone as is the air intake and fuel management system. A mustang seat and sissy bar. My 12" mini-apes arrived yesterday and that should do it. My long ride? I plan to leave Las Vegas, head up yo see Oregon, then head east to visit some cousins in Maine then home. A backpack, a bag on sissy bar (maybe front and back side) and I'm off.
 

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Hey there, I’m looking to buy a new bike and I have narrowed to two, one being the Honda fury.
How does the bike perform in corners and windy roads? And does it countersteer? I watched so many videos on YouTube but they are mainly on straight roads and and cornering they do they are not countersteering. I plan on using the bike for my everyday vehicle, I don't own a car
I ride everyday in the good weather(I have a car for rain). I might recommend that you move the front turn signals as low as you can. It'll minimize tank damage if you put your bike down accidentally. Also a set of risers for the handlebars is also a welcome addition since they not only lift but also set back the bars. This makes for a bit more comfortable ride. These aren't necessary just advice. I've made the changes but love the bike as it comes. My choices were mostly accommodations to medical necessity.
 
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