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Discussion Starter #1
Any of you changed your own rear pads? If so can you give me a quick walkthrough. On the cbr you push the caliper in before taking bolt out to compress piston, Is fury the same? I don't wanna pay anymore for simple crap so planning to do myself. :) Thanks.
 

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Pretty much the same, push the caliper towards the wheel, remove the pin plug, top rear of the caliper, remove pin the pads come right out, install new pads, make sure the ends are in the retainer, replace pin (make sure it is clean) torque 13 lb-ft, replace the plug, torque to 1.8 lb-ft, pump up the brakes to seat the pistons. You must really ride the brakes to be changing already.
 

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Pretty much the same, push the caliper towards the wheel, remove the pin plug, top rear of the caliper, remove pin the pads come right out, install new pads, make sure the ends are in the retainer, replace pin (make sure it is clean) torque 13 lb-ft, replace the plug, torque to 1.8 lb-ft, pump up the brakes to seat the pistons. You must really ride the brakes to be changing already.
Yeah Clueless has it right... a real simple job that no one should have to pay for... you do not even have to pull the caliber. The only thing I want to add is make sure you pull the backing plate off the old ones and install it on your new pads. It took me around 15 min max to do the job. Not sure what you have for mileage but I got around 16K on my stock pads. If you want to save a few dollars on your pads, you can get a set of EBC pads (part # FA 174)... that was the route I went since it was about $15.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have 7k miles on the pads lol, fronts look new still. The RC chrome rotors I think caused more wear than factory rotors, front isn't as smooth as factory that's why they are not used as much.
 

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Yea... just changed my back break @ 15k miles as well... front brake is still going good... back brake took about 15-20 min... easy actually.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the help, took about 15 mins to change. I bought the Honda replacement pads and the metal backing was already on them so didn't even need to transfer that over.
 

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I find it interesting that a lot of people are wearing-out their rear brake pads before their fronts. Could it be that there's some of us who haven't yet figured out that the most effective braking is achieved by using the front brake, preferentially to the rear? There's a reason why our Fury's have two calipers up front (and only one in back), in addition to a larger diameter brake-disc. It's the same reason that high-performance sportbikes, and even my Goldwing for that matter, have two sets of discs and calipers on the front wheel, and it comes at a cost of a lot of extra, and undesirable, unsprung weight; in a rapid-deceleration mode, due to weight-transfer, over 90% of your available braking action is provided by the front brake! The rear brake, under those conditions, is almost ineffective, serving mainly like a sea-anchor to keep the rear-end from passing-up the front-end. Think about it. I always get a perverse chuckle when some dumbass biker, in describing a near-miss, tells me, "Ya, I had to lay 'er down". What I actually hear him saying is that he panicked, locked-up the rear brake, and the bike slid-out from under him! Flat-trackers and dirt-bikers know just how hard it is to, controllably, throw a bike sideways; on pavement, it's virtually impossible!

In summary, if you really want to acquire the skill to extract the maximum braking effectiveness from your bike, and be able to do it reflexively, you really need to start mastering the front brake, almost to the exclusion of the rear. As it becomes routine, you'll notice that your braking distances become dramatically shorter, and, you'll be wearing-out your front brake pads about twice as fast as your rear's, instead of the other way-round. Learn, evolve, and survive!

Climbing down off of soapbox................

Cheers
 

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Yeah Clueless has it right... a real simple job that no one should have to pay for... you do not even have to pull the caliber. The only thing I want to add is make sure you pull the backing plate off the old ones and install it on your new pads. It took me around 15 min max to do the job. Not sure what you have for mileage but I got around 16K on my stock pads. If you want to save a few dollars on your pads, you can get a set of EBC pads (part # FA 174)... that was the route I went since it was about $15.
Most folks opt for the OEM, you will probably find the EBC will not save you much in the long run, the OEM come w/backing plate.
I find it interesting that a lot of people are wearing-out their rear brake pads before their fronts. Could it be that there's some of us who haven't yet figured out that the most effective braking is achieved by using the front brake, preferentially to the rear? There's a reason why our Fury's have two calipers up front (and only one in back), in addition to a larger diameter brake-disc. It's the same reason that high-performance sportbikes, and even my Goldwing for that matter, have two sets of discs and calipers on the front wheel, and it comes at a cost of a lot of extra, and undesirable, unsprung weight; in a rapid-deceleration mode, due to weight-transfer, over 90% of your available braking action is provided by the front brake! The rear brake, under those conditions, is almost ineffective, serving mainly like a sea-anchor to keep the rear-end from passing-up the front-end. Think about it. I always get a perverse chuckle when some dumbass biker, in describing a near-miss, tells me, "Ya, I had to lay 'er down". What I actually hear him saying is that he panicked, locked-up the rear brake, and the bike slid-out from under him! Flat-trackers and dirt-bikers know just how hard it is to, controllably, throw a bike sideways; on pavement, it's virtually impossible!

In summary, if you really want to acquire the skill to extract the maximum braking effectiveness from your bike, and be able to do it reflexively, you really need to start mastering the front brake, almost to the exclusion of the rear. As it becomes routine, you'll notice that your braking distances become dramatically shorter, and, you'll be wearing-out your front brake pads about twice as fast as your rear's, instead of the other way-round. Learn, evolve, and survive!

Climbing down off of soapbox................

Cheers
+1 I change ALOT of brake pads, usually change the front 3x before the rears, I also find it strange that some folks are changing them at only 12 - 15k
 

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heres a little nerd knowledge from the riding class i took... you should always use both brakes. no matter how fast you are decelerating. you get 70% of your stopping power from the front brake.

so to stop effectively use the front. to stop "properly" use the rear as well.

and as im sure you know, never use you front brake in a turn. the front tire will scrub out on ya.

have a good one guys
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Barfury I agree with you, at least on all of my other bikes. I find I use MORE on the rear on the fury. The factory rotors may have been a more 50/50 blend of breaking which is what any class teaches, but I replaced my factories with matching RC rotors to go with the wheels. Ever since then the front isn't anywhere near as smooth as stock therefore I barely use them. They feel like when you hit a cars brakes and you have warped front rotors, but hey they look bad ass. Now I am starting to sound like a Harley rider lol.
 

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heres a little nerd knowledge from the riding class i took... you should always use both brakes. no matter how fast you are decelerating. you get 70% of your stopping power from the front brake.

Actually, it's more than that; more than 90%; ever seen somebody do a front-wheel "brakie" and raise the rear wheel completely off the ground?

so to stop effectively use the front. to stop "properly" use the rear as well.

Agreed, but under maximum braking conditions, you're using the rear just to keep things tracking straight; there's very little braking force available from the rear.

and as im sure you know, never use you front brake in a turn. the front tire will scrub out on ya.

Disagree! Once you've mastered using the front brake, you can use it in any mode, turning or otherwise; just don't let it lock up! Careful practice leads to mastery.

have a good one guys
***************************************
 

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Don't some of the newer bikes use the front-rear shared-load braking with their ABS versions?
 

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Don't some of the newer bikes use the front-rear shared-load braking with their ABS versions?
Yes, biased to the front, and with anti-lock.

Cheers
 

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Yes, biased to the front, and with anti-lock.

Cheers
both of my MFC instructors kind of frowned at the ABS and dual-mode brakes. I don't have enough bike riding experience to frame a decent argument for or agin' it.

But, it does seem like ABS is a good solution to bike braking issues.
 

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both of my MFC instructors kind of frowned at the ABS and dual-mode brakes. I don't have enough bike riding experience to frame a decent argument for or agin' it.

it seems like ABS is a good solution to bike braking issues.
As often happens, instructors (especially older ones) can be set in their ways, and not very open or responsive to change, until that change has evolved to become the accepted standard.

Now, is ABS better than standard? I would say yes, especially if you're just starting out in biking and/or are less-experienced. It virtually eliminates the possibility of lock-up, even when you panic, and that alone will keep a lot of lower-time riders from crashing. Is it the end-all/be-all answer to motorcycle braking? No, I think not, and it will never replace or supplant skill, experience, and good-judgement. It may, however, help keep you alive long enough to acquire those three attributes.

Do I have it? No, not on my Wing, not on my Concours, and not on my Fury. Do I want it, or feel that I need it? No, it's an expensive option that I don't believe would improve my riding experience or safety. After 50-some years of riding, spread over 33 of my own machines, plus many others, I've just about got this braking thing figured out! LOL. My two-bits..........

Cheers
 

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As often happens, instructors (especially older ones) can be set in their ways, and not very open or responsive to change, until that change has evolved to become the accepted standard.

Now, is ABS better than standard? I would say yes, especially if you're just starting out in biking and/or are less-experienced. It virtually eliminates the possibility of lock-up, even when you panic, and that alone will keep a lot of lower-time riders from crashing. Is it the end-all/be-all answer to motorcycle braking? No, I think not, and it will never replace or supplant skill, experience, and good-judgement. It may, however, help keep you alive long enough to acquire those three attributes.

Do I have it? No, not on my Wing, not on my Concours, and not on my Fury. Do I want it, or feel that I need it? No, it's an expensive option that I don't believe would improve my riding experience or safety. After 50-some years of riding, spread over 33 of my own machines, plus many others, I've just about got this braking thing figured out! LOL. My two-bits..........

Cheers
gracias- i do appreciate an intelligent opinion. maybe my next bike will have ABS.
 

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Most folks opt for the OEM, you will probably find the EBC will not save you much in the long run, the OEM come w/backing plate.
Well you are right Clueless that the EBC pads do not come with a backing plate... but you also fail to say that before you toss the old OEM pads out to the trash, you should remove the plate and anti-squeal plastic... So even if it does not come with a set of backing plates you can still use the product. It is not the backing plate that will make this pair of pads a bad choice but rather is the material on the pad is to strong for the rotor or vise versa, the pads are to soft for the rotor. When I am do for another set of pads on the rear we will know if EBC is going to hold up to OEM pads on the Fury... will keep you all posted in about 8 months... or 12K miles... which ever comes first.
 
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