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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I notice today that my rear disk brake was really hot -- to hot to touch. Front was cool to touch.
Could the Mayham pipes cause this?
Any thoughts?
T
 

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I'd be willing to bet it's the new rotors, maybe a shade thicker than the stock ones? If so the brakes are dragging causing the heat. Just a thought, but if thats the case you might end up with a warped rotor.
 

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I notice today that my rear disk brake was really hot -- to hot to touch. Front was cool to touch.
Tasmin, sounds like the rear pads are not releasing enough. The floating caliper is self adjusting on a square cross-section seal and sliding pins. Make sure your master cylinder has air space above the diaphragm to allow the piston to retract. The other possibility is a sticking caliper; either the sliding pins or the piston could be hanging up but that is unusual on a new cycle. Simplest way to check with the wheel off the ground is to rotate the wheel in neutral and check for brake drag. If you are not sure, back off your caliper pads a smidge and compare. Just don't pry on the pads; move the caliper in and out a bit. If you are not sure about this see your dealer. Too much heat on the rotor can warp it causing a pulsation in the pedal.
 

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I notice today that my rear disk brake was really hot -- to hot to touch. Front was cool to touch.
Could the Mayham pipes cause this?
Any thoughts?
T
I agree with Garc.
You changed several things at once, new wheels, did it come with a new rotor or did you reuse the existing?
I remember you also changed the forward controls at the same time, did it include a new rear brake master cyclinder?
I do remember you posting a problem with bleeding the air out of the brake lines.

It could be you new master cylinder is adjusted improperly applying pressure all the time.

Like garc expressed above, you need to lift the rear wheel off the ground in neutral to see the resistance the rear brake is applying on the rotor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I agree with Garc.
You changed several things at once, new wheels, did it come with a new rotor or did you reuse the existing?
I remember you also changed the forward controls at the same time, did it include a new rear brake master cyclinder?
I do remember you posting a problem with bleeding the air out of the brake lines.
It could be you new master cylinder is adjusted improperly applying pressure all the time.
Like garc expressed above, you need to lift the rear wheel off the ground in neutral to see the resistance the rear brake is applying on the rotor.
Thanks guys! Will keep you posted.
I have the dealer put on the new wheels and rotors. They stated the new rotors were thicker thus they had to adjust the calipers.
Have a great weekend!
T
 

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Thanks guys! Will keep you posted.
I have the dealer put on the new wheels and rotors. They stated the new rotors were thicker thus they had to adjust the calipers.
Have a great weekend!
T
It may be just semantics but one does not adjust a hydraulic caliper. The caliper is opened or spread to allow easy installation and self compensation takes over from there as you apply the brakes. I am wondering if the new wheel has the rotor displaced laterally, slightly out of range of the caliper's potential opening? A bit of wear on the affected pad would release the drag eventually but at what cost (R). If that is the case you could block sand the victimized pad a little to regain normal operation. Why new rotors? Are they chromed? Heat should be the same at both ends in any case.

On the other hand if you have adopted chopper riding techniques, isn’t using rear brake alone one of them?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It may be just semantics but one does not adjust a hydraulic caliper. The caliper is opened or spread to allow easy installation and self compensation takes over from there as you apply the brakes. I am wondering if the new wheel has the rotor displaced laterally, slightly out of range of the caliper's potential opening? A bit of wear on the affected pad would release the drag eventually but at what cost (R). If that is the case you could block sand the victimized pad a little to regain normal operation. Why new rotors? Are they chromed? Heat should be the same at both ends in any case.

On the other hand if you have adopted chopper riding techniques, isn’t using rear brake alone one of them?
Yes they are chrome. Chopper riding technique? Never knew one existed. Since 75% of my stopping power is in the front -- I use both with equal amounts of pressure.
Thanks for the info. Going for a ride in a bit and will see what happens.
T
 

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Yes they are chrome. Chopper riding technique? Never knew one existed.
Some of the more radical choppers don't have front brakes and their rear brake is on the transmission output shaft so when the chain breaks... :eek:

Don't know much about chrome other than it's very shiny. Shiny means very smooth and very smooth means ??? stopping power :confused:
Also I wonder about heat dissipation characteristics of a chromed rotor?
So Tasmin, how does the chrome affect the brake feel and stopping power on your (awesome:cool:) Fury?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Some of the more radical choppers don't have front brakes and their rear brake is on the transmission output shaft so when the chain breaks... :eek:

Don't know much about chrome other than it's very shiny. Shiny means very smooth and very smooth means ??? stopping power :confused:
Also I wonder about heat dissipation characteristics of a chromed rotor?
So Tasmin, how does the chrome affect the brake feel and stopping power on your (awesome:cool:) Fury?
No front brakes? Yikes. Seems like a great way to end up as road pizza.
The chrome rotors do have less stopping power. Don't notice any other feeling except it takes a touch longer to stop.
T
 

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No front brakes? Yikes. Seems like a great way to end up as road pizza.
The chrome rotors do have less stopping power. Don't notice any other feeling except it take a touch longer to stop.
T
ummm, haven't read the whole thread... but seriously, front brakes are the most important thing on a bike besides the motor... 79-90% of of your stopping power comes from the front brakes... Something you learn in class and on the road... seriously, wouldn't want to take my chances no matter how good it looks...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
ummm, haven't read the whole thread... but seriously, front brakes are the most important thing on a bike besides the motor... 79-90% of of your stopping power comes from the front brakes... Something you learn in class and on the road... seriously, wouldn't want to take my chances no matter how good it looks...
Screw the looks -- I want to have the ability to stop before a Super Tanker would.
T
 

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ummm, haven't read the whole thread... but seriously, front brakes are the most important thing on a bike besides the motor... 79-90% of of your stopping power comes from the front brakes... Something you learn in class and on the road... seriously, wouldn't want to take my chances no matter how good it looks...
Orange County Choppers got lots of grief because none of their bikes had front brakes.
 
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