Honda Fury Forums: banner

21 - 40 of 55 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,556 Posts


Factory wiring to lights and horn button is 12V; what you've added like your tag light is not so as long as you tap in on the factory wire you are good to go. Again, the horn black wire is switched but will not work. Your best bet is to use the Red/Black 'option' wire in the empty fuse slot in the fuse block. You can plug a soldered wire tip (for stiffness) into the single female pin; the other pin is normally absent.


This would provide you an UNFUSED circuit, you should add a fuse to your wireing if you do this.
 

·
Septuagenarian Rider
Joined
·
4,151 Posts
Any particular size for the fuse?
No more than 10A although since this circuit is just a signal wire it probably draws less than 1A.

If you want to do your wiring by the book all wires should also be protected with a sleeve just as Honda has done. I have added a number of electrical accessories to my bike and have protected all the new wiring to prevent chafing and short circuits.
 

·
Septuagenarian Rider
Joined
·
4,151 Posts
Another excellent lesson Gar , love it , thank you .
I paid a visit to the wrecking yard and picked up terminals from a Japanese car that matched the Fury fuse and relay female pins.

I don't care for the practice of stacking wires on to the battery terminals as aftermarket suppliers would have your do (Honda doesn't do it) so I added additional circuits to the fuse block to power my accessories.
Some of my fuses are in a different position after I did some rearranging
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,710 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
That pic is exactly what I need. Will make it easier for a dumb guy like me... lol. So what should I tap into then? K? I was thinking about splicing into A.

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Septuagenarian Rider
Joined
·
4,151 Posts
Generally speaking red wires connect to the positive battery terminal and are not fuse protected; most other colored wires are fuse protected except green which is ground (connected to the negative battery terminal through the frame). If in doubt probe with a test light with it's lead connected to ground.
That pic is exactly what I need. Will make it easier for a dumb guy like me... lol. So what should I tap into then? K? I was thinking about splicing into A.
Don't go by the picture of my fuse block since I have rearranged it and have ABS but the letters are correct. If you don't want to add a fuse then tap into A, B, C or D on the fused side as Clueless mentioned previously. Test for fused side by removing the fuse to prove power loss. If you want to add a fuse get an inline fuse and tap into the fuse slot with the single terminal.

As I added to a previous post (in case you missed it) ...
If you want to do your wiring by the book all wires should also be protected with a sleeve just as Honda has done. I have added a number of electrical accessories to my bike and have protected all the new wiring to prevent chafing and short circuits.
Your auto parts store sells split sheathing in various diameters.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,556 Posts
Generally speaking red wires connect to the positive battery terminal and are not fuse protected; most other colored wires are fuse protected except green which is ground (connected to the negative battery terminal through the frame). If in doubt probe with a test light with it's lead connected to ground.


The only wire not fused is the main cable going to the starter relay, power there is tapped off thru the main fuse to the ign switch or to the fuse box. Every circuit you add should be fused as close to the power as possible .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,635 Posts
The only wire not fused is the main cable going to the starter relay, power there is tapped off thru the main fuse to the ign switch or to the fuse box. Every circuit you add should be fused as close to the power as possible .
So, are you saying 1) tap into the power source 2) fuse 3) connect to whatever you are adding
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,556 Posts
So, are you saying 1) tap into the power source 2) fuse 3) connect to whatever you are adding
I'm saying if you go directly to the battery yes, batt, fuse, load. If you add to another existing circuit that is fused (say the brown running lights wire) you do not need another fuse
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,635 Posts
I'm saying if you go directly to the battery yes, batt, fuse, load. If you add to another existing circuit that is fused (say the brown running lights wire) you do not need another fuse
Cool, thanks. I will remember this :)
 

·
Septuagenarian Rider
Joined
·
4,151 Posts
The only wire not fused is the main cable going to the starter relay, power there is tapped off thru the main fuse to the ign switch or to the fuse box. Every circuit you add should be fused as close to the power as possible .
The main fuse is 30 amps so any added accessory will still need a smaller fuse. If you don't a short circuit can melt insulation on any wires grouped together. That's the reason I said that "Generally speaking red wires connect to the positive battery terminal and are not fuse protected." but of course there is more to the story. You don't get all the answers in one thread when it takes years to learn this stuff. The important part is that you don't want to tap into the red, red/black or red/green wires because they are on the supply side to the fuse. Even the switched R/Bl option wire you need to add a fuse so that it becomes just like the others in the fuse block. Take your power after the fuse no matter which switched circuit you choose: A, B, C, D or Option.

All the power feed wires going into the fuse box are a red base color. Always hot (12V) are solid red, ignition key switched wires are red with black and ABS wires if you have them are red with green and always hot. Some of the wires are not protected by the 30A main fuse. On standard bikes it's the red feed wire to the 20A fuse for all the engine run circuits. ABS bikes have two more unprotected feeds (red with green) going to two 30A fuses.

Working without a wiring diagram is about as effective as riding unfamiliar roads without a map. Even if it looks like spaghetti it will start to make sense once you get into it. At least our bikes are all on one sheet of paper and not hundreds of pages like most new cars these days.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,710 Posts
Discussion Starter #35
This looks like a simple solution. Can I just plug this into my headlight fuse slot and then stick the fuse into the side of the adapter? Will I need two fuses since there are two slots in the adapter?
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,556 Posts
This looks like a simple solution. Can I just plug this into my headlight fuse slot and then stick the fuse into the side of the adapter? Will I need two fuses since there are two slots in the adapter?
The original (headlamp) fuse will go in the 1st and the new (alarm) fuse will go to the 2nd.

If you PM me your address, I have a pin that will go into the stock fusebox (at the option slot) then you can solder you alarm hot to it, put a fuse in the stock fuse box and have a neater install. (if you do not have lights in the option spot already)
 

·
Septuagenarian Rider
Joined
·
4,151 Posts
... I have a pin that will go into the stock fusebox (at the option slot) then you can solder you alarm hot to it, put a fuse in the stock fuse box and have a neater install.
John, does Honda make these female pins available or where can you get them besides Japanese cars at the wrecking yard ?

I have added two fused circuits this way and non ABS bikes can add up to five in the empty slots.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,556 Posts
John, does Honda make these female pins available or where can you get them besides Japanese cars at the wrecking yard ?

I have added two fused circuits this way and non ABS bikes can add up to five in the empty slots.
I scavanged some from a Goldwing wireing harness that we replaced a few years ago.
 
21 - 40 of 55 Posts
Top