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24,000 miles and switching over to ME888's in stock size.
Probably try Avon's next.
Tire choices in stock Fury sizes are becoming very few.
No complaints with the Bridgestones. Awesome as ever.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
I was negligent in updating this with my latest tire change back in August. Here are my stats so far:

Back - 200/50R - 18
April 27, 2012 - 21,469km - replaced OEM with Metzeler ME880
September 28, 2012 - 32,822km - replaced Metzeler ME880 with Dunlop E3
June 12, 2014 - 50,564km - replaced Dunlop E3 with another Dunlop E3
March 29, 2016 - 72,730km - replaced Dunlop E3 with another Dunlop E3
May 30, 2017 - 87,060km - replaced Dunlop E3 with another Dunlop E3
August 2, 2018 - 107,134km - replaced Dunlop E3 with another Dunlop E3


Front - 90/90 - 21
April 27, 2012 - 21,469km - replaced OEM with Metzeler ME880
July 8, 2013 - 44,703km - replaced Metzeler ME880 with Dunlop E3
May 26, 2015 - 60,720km - replaced Dunlop E3 with another Dunlop E3
August 12, 2016 - 82,741km - replaced Dunlop E3 with another Dunlop E3
August 2, 2018 - 107,134km - replaced Dunlop E3 with another Dunlop E3
 

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Seems like kind of a dead topic but here goes anyway. Just got back from a 1700 mile trip from Jacksonville Fl to TN, NC and back. Mountain roads rock, and while I know the Fury will never be a canyon carver, there have got to be some better tires out there than the E3's. I always ran Michelin Commander II's on my vtx, and while I know that isnt a viable option, is there anything else? The E4's have a groove in the front that makes me feel like its gonna walknon tar snakes and grooves, and the metz 888 seems to be a weird choice with its wider contact patch, seems like it would make it ever harder to flick the fury into a turn. Does anyone have any insight or feedback? Id like a tire that can do the miles, but not make me feel like im about to lowside.
 

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Firstly, regardless of the model of tire, tires should be the same size if they are marked the same size and from the same manufacturer.

ME888 90/90-21

The 888 is a newer compound than the 880 and said to last longer mileage wise. It will follow the new wavy-line grooved cement, but not anything else that I've come across.

There are two competing factors you should be looking at: 1.) Stickiness. 2.) Longevity. 3.) Price.

1.) "Stickiness" is really "tire performance" and describes how well the tire maintains traction under certain conditions. A race slick has the best contact patch but won't shed rain as there are no rain grooves, so that's a problem if it rains. Race tires have great traction at high temperatures, something that doesn't happen at freeway speeds; street tires generally lose grip suddenly at 40°F/5°C, so if you ride in temperatures under 40°F this is a concern.




2.) The harder the tire, the longer it lasts. The average tire sacrifices one layer of molecules every revolution. Stickier/softer tires grip the road far better, conforming to cracks and crevices, sinking in those rough areas and forming a bond, which is then ripped away as the tire is pulled from the road, leaving some of it behind and shortening the life of the tire. Hard tire compounds don't fill in the voids and don't get ripped apart by the road, and that results in better gas mileage too--but you know those guys who fear grass clippings in the road? Yeah, it's because they're not running tires soft enough to deal with a little grass. These guys hit gravel-or worse, sand-and they're going down like a sack of spuds that just fell off the turnip truck--don't be that guy (or gal).

3.) Price. In part it's the tire compound, but mostly it's the amount of rubber stuck to the carcass. If the tire is going to lose one layer of molecules every revolution, simply add more rubber. That drives the price up because there's not only additional material costs but there are other side-effects of adding rubber (such as over-all give resulting in a "squirmy, wandering-worm feeling) that must be considered, but the tire does last longer. Tread depth matters. Top-end tire manufacturers will use harder rubber in the center of the tire and softer rubber on the edges, plus the underlying belt structure will make the tire edges softer so cornering grip is better, and these things add to the cost.

That brings us back to three things, but two competing factors: The value of your life vs. your wallet. Because the Fury is a stripped chopper pretty much everything on the Fury is critical (there's not much fluff on the bike). If your life is important, my advice is to buy the best replacement parts you can afford.

Turning: How to ride on cold tires

 

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I agree 100%, so with that said, what tire is "the best" for our bikes? Obviously longevity matters, but I dont expect or need 25k out of a tire. I read on this thread people running the Metz 880 swapped out for the E3's, and while some (very few) ran the avons, nobody seems to speak of the longevity. Does anyone have the Metz888? How does it stack up to the E3? If it helps, I live in Fl but I tend to ride "enthusiastically", rain is a regular thing here, and im a big guy 5'10" 280. My trip to the Cherohala skyway just made me question the Dunlops that tbh I was never a fan of. Any help is appreciated.
 

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Being in Jacksonville, Florida, you probably want to look for a tire:
  • known to have good traction above 50° F (that's as cold as it gets in "winter," correct?)
  • rated for the speeds you'll be driving (perhaps "high speed" so it can handle the heat, although this isn't a crotch-rocket)
  • has a tread pattern that works with your environment
  • has the longevity you're looking for
  • is in your price range
A tire that works well for me probably isn't the best for you. If you read the reviews on TireRack (or wherever you can find them) it doesn't matter so much that the bike is exactly the same as the Fury, it's more the usage is similar (Southern state, moderate riding style as apposed to crotch-rocket canyon carver in Canadia).
 

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I agree 100%, so with that said, what tire is "the best" for our bikes? Obviously longevity matters, but I dont expect or need 25k out of a tire. I read on this thread people running the Metz 880 swapped out for the E3's, and while some (very few) ran the avons, nobody seems to speak of the longevity. Does anyone have the Metz888? How does it stack up to the E3? If it helps, I live in Fl but I tend to ride "enthusiastically", rain is a regular thing here, and im a big guy 5'10" 280. My trip to the Cherohala skyway just made me question the Dunlops that tbh I was never a fan of. Any help is appreciated.
I swapped out the Dunlop E3s for Metzeler 880s and I'm very happy with the extra grip. Much better on the worn uneven roads in Sydney and in the wet.
 

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Mine came stock with Metzler 880's, got 8k miles out of them. Don't know if that is good or bad, I was happy with how they rode. Just replaced them, I was told that they no longer make the M880, it has been replaced with the ME888. Just picked it up tonight, I'll see how they ride. Was good on the way home. I think I have Dunlops on MAx, they seem to ride fine as well.
 

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Mine came stock with Metzler 880's, got 8k miles out of them. Don't know if that is good or bad, I was happy with how they rode. Just replaced them, I was told that they no longer make the M880, it has been replaced with the ME888. Just picked it up tonight, I'll see how they ride. Was good on the way home. I think I have Dunlops on MAx, they seem to ride fine as well.
Very curious about the metz 888, if I can get 10-12k miles out of em and better grip I will be a happy camper. Also, yeah Jacksonville winters are mild, they get a little colder than 50 degrees ? but not much. Thank you all very much for the input, please let me know about the 888's, that seems like the most promising choice.
 

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From personal experience, the ME888 Ultras have an excellent tread pattern, seem to wear well, and has great traction. The ME888 replaces the high-mileage, well-known ME880 touring tire. The ME888 has more rubber and a better compound than the ME880 so lasts longer without sacrificing grip. HOWEVER, turning is sh*t, especially problematic since the Fury isn't the "heavy tourer" the ME888 was made for, and what makes matters worse is the Fury is a "raked-out chopper." Why is that bad? The ME888 sidewall is hard as a rock. Ride is sacrificed and the tire bounces through turns instead of soaking them up.

I've run a Dunlop D404 and it's sticky, the tread pattern looks good and is very functional, grip is good, mileage is good, turning is good, it lasts a long time on a lighter-weight cruising bike like the Fury, but if you're running a heavy bike or fat bagger you'll want the D401 / D402 to handle the load.

You might want to check out the Michelin Commander II--the is the tire the ME888 is trying to be (seriously). It's not a great looking tire for most bikes but it does look good on the Fury, and while turning kind of sucks it does what you're looking for as far as grip and mileage, plus it runs a bit less $ than the ME888.


 

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From personal experience, the ME888 Ultras have an excellent tread pattern, seem to wear well, and has great traction. The ME888 replaces the high-mileage, well-known ME880 touring tire. The ME888 has more rubber and a better compound than the ME880 so lasts longer
without sacrificing grip. HOWEVER, turning is sh*t, especially problematic since the Fury isn't the "heavy tourer" the ME888 was made for, and what makes matters worse is the Fury is a "raked-out chopper." Why is that bad? The ME888 sidewall is hard as a rock. Ride is sacrificed and the tire bounces through turns instead of soaking them up.

I've run a Dunlop D404 and it's sticky, the tread pattern looks good and is very functional, grip is good, mileage is good, turning is good, it lasts a long time on a lighter-weight cruising bike like the Fury, but if you're running a heavy bike or fat bagger you'll want the D401 / D402 to handle the load.

You might want to check out the Michelin Commander II--the is the tire the ME888 is trying to be (seriously). It's not a great looking tire for most bikes but it does look good on the Fury, and while turning kind of sucks it does what you're looking for as far as grip and mileage, plus it runs a bit less $ than the ME888.


Michelin does not make a rear tire for the fury or the problem would be solved.
 

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I’m running the 888 up front and on the rear. Personally I didn’t like the e3 on the rear. The 888 may be a littler firmer than the 880 I had before but I’m still happy with it. The 888 up front however has worn fast. Granted I’m running the mh-90/21 which is a shade narrower than the 90-90/21. They didn’t make our size when I first wanted to try the new 888.
 

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Michelin does not make a rear tire for the fury or the problem would be solved.
When a 200 isn't available several people here have mounted a 240/40 R18 from Avon, Cobra, Pirelli, Metzler... With that said a Michelin 240 should work, though it's certainly not stock and there is the risk of losing the bead as with any 240 on a 200 rim.
 

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People here generally mount a 240/40 R18 from Avon, Cobra, Pirelli, Metzler...don't know why a Michelin wouldn't work, though it's certainly not stock and there is the risk of losing the bead as with any 240 on a 200 rim.
'People here generally'.... it would seem that a small percentage have done this, not all or even most. I was perfectly happy with OEM size, went right back to it with new tires.
 

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HOWEVER, turning is sh*t, especially problematic since the Fury isn't the "heavy tourer" the ME888 was made for, and what makes matters worse is the Fury is a "raked-out chopper." Why is that bad? The ME888 sidewall is hard as a rock. Ride is sacrificed and the tire bounces through turns instead of soaking them up.
Pretty much none of this is true. The ME888 Performs just as well as the ME880. Turning is just fine, and no worse than it was. The fury has always been an excellent handling bike as it doesn't weigh a lot, has a very low center of gravity. Turn in on the 888 is just as easy as the 880 was, doesn't 'bounce' through a corner at all (and some of these are pretty rough roads) and the ride is pretty much the same. Can't speak to wear life yet. Give me a couple years.

I would recommend the ME888 to anybody that was looking for tires.
 

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Pretty much none of this is true. The ME888 Performs just as well as the ME880. Turning is just fine, and no worse than it was. The fury has always been an excellent handling bike as it doesn't weigh a lot, has a very low center of gravity. Turn in on the 888 is just as easy as the 880 was, doesn't 'bounce' through a corner at all (and some of these are pretty rough roads) and the ride is pretty much the same. Can't speak to wear life yet. Give me a couple years.

I would recommend the ME888 to anybody that was looking for tires.
The ME888 is focused on high-mileage for touring bikes at the expense of other factors, pretty much any site that reviewed this tire and Metzeler themselves states that to varying degrees. The Fury is lighter than a touring bike and is raked out further, exacerbating the stiff sidewall situation. The 888's sidewall is stiffer than the 880, which is fine on heavier bikes, just not as good on lighter bikes, choppers, and in this case a lighter chopper.

Like any "chopper" the Fury is not an "excellent handling bike," although it is excellent for the style of bike. The ME888 isn't an excellent handling tire, but it is one of the top tires for the bike it was designed for. Overall it's a good choice for the Fury, but the ride isn't plush, and turning isn't great. If properly inflated the tire transmits sharp changes in pavement to the forks, and it's more noticeable around turns where the forks don't absorb as much. When leaning the bike over the "hop" or "bounce" is noticeable--not like it comes clean off the pavement, but on a large lean angle it has an impact.

On city streets that's not usually a huge concern, though under less-than-ideal conditions it can be. We have a large left-hand sweeping turn on the Milwaukee fly-overs with a wavy-grooved pattern in the concrete, so taking it at the speed limit challenges motorcycle suspensions. The ME880 on the Fury does okay but not great. The ME888 causes the chassis to upset due to the sidewall stiffness. Fattten the rear tire (like three T's fat) and/or rake the front out further and the situation is even more noticeable (meaning it's wise to shave off 10 MPH before entering the turn).

Is the ME888 a bad tire? No, it's pretty good on the Fury, better on bikes it was designed for. From a handling standpoint the ME880 is better on the Fury, though discontinued. the 888 doesn't actually handle "like sh*t" as a really hard discount tire would, but there are better options. I'd rather have better handling than better mileage so that when things get dicey the shiny side stays up.

:wink:
 

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I put a Shinko 777 90/90/21 on at 9k miles and it looks and feels great.. and quite inexpensive to boot.. Looking forward to doing the same for the rear whenever that time comes, it seems the rear far outlasts the front on the Fury
 

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I put a Shinko 777 90/90/21 on at 9k miles and it looks and feels great.. and quite inexpensive to boot.. Looking forward to doing the same for the rear whenever that time comes, it seems the rear far outlasts the front on the Fury
Weird, My rear was bald, still tread on the front. I just replaced both at the same time. I could go Dunlop, I have those on my Yamaha, I've liked them fine,
 
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