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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)




I ordered this kit through STG five months ago, and finally got the install finished. It was a long saga that involved getting ripped off by a painter.

I thought it would be best to post up my experiences with this kit so that others would know what to expect when they're considering putting a lot of money into this.


So what do you get?

A subframe extension support.
A fender.
Two saddle bags.
Two saddle bag lids with magnetic locks.
Two side covers for the swing arm.
Bolts n bolts for mounting.

So what is the good?

The fiberglassing in this kit is excellent. All the parts are thick and solidly constructed. The entire kit looks built to last.

The saddle bags are awesome. They look awesome. They sit there and look awesome. And they have a lot of room in them. There's so much more room for activities now that I have them...

Everyone turns their heads and looks. Everyone. You thought your Fury got looks before with your gangster fender installed? Wait until they see this.

How it all holds together.

The subframe extension bolts into the four mounting holes left by removing the stock tail light assembly.

The fender has nuts sealed into it at the mount points. Long bolts pass from the inside, through regular holes in the subframe extension, and thread through the sealed nuts. This holds the subframe and fender together. The bolts are now sticking out of the fender. The saddle bags slide onto them, and another nut is applied to hold it in place.


So what are the major issues to consider?

This kit was built for the stock Fury, and the stock Fury alone. So lets see what that entails...

#1: Bottoming out.

Its a slammed bagger, and as with all slammed baggers you'll need to take care when riding. There's plenty of clearance in the bags for leaning into the corners. However, slow and steady when cornering into a transition of incline is the name of the game.

There's only about six inches of clearance from the rear tip of the fender to the ground without you sitting on it. The bike rides fine on the streets and the highways. But you'll find yourself bottoming out the end tip of the fender a lot when entering drive ways and any sharp inclines.

As such, this will not work with a lowered spring, or a lowered air ride. Those with air rides will have to pump it to the top.

If you're afraid of losing air in your air ride while riding, at which point interesting things are going to happen, this kit is definitely not for you.

If you like to use your bike as a daily driver, then get used to have scraped paint on bottom of the fender's tip. There's no way to avoid this.

Fork extensions that raise your front end will obviously have an affect on the clearance as well.

There is no two up riding. Even if both you and your significant other were to weigh 150lbs each.

Honestly, I think most of this could have been avoided if the bottom of the fender hadn't been extended so far past the saddle bags. Take a good look at the first photo above. You can see how long it makes the bike past the rear wheel base. If the rear tip had been shortened to be in line with the back edge of the saddle bags, I think 90% of the bottoming out would be cured.

#2: Fitment.

These parts are not factory produced. They're hand made, and as such, not everything is going to line up perfectly. Don't expect to follow the instructions and have everything on in a couple of hours. Expect to spend many many long hours fitting this kit. You will be removing and installing and removing and installing over and over until you've got it modified and fitted right. A set of ratcheting ring wrenches will be the best friend you ever had.

#3: Modifications.

Remember how I mentioned this was made for the stock Fury?

Only the stock rider and passenger seats fit the fender. Any after market seats and/or luggage racks, etc, will require you cutting and re-fiberglassing the seat area to get them to fit.

The right side saddle bag comes in two models. One with a cut out for the stock pipes. And one without for short pipes. You'll let STG know what you need when ordering. If you have any long pipes, like Cobra swepts, then you're probably be looking at modifying the cut out to fit.

The right side swing arm cover comes in two models as well. One short piece for the stock pipes. And one longer piece for short pipes. You'll let STG know what you need when ordering. The longer piece doesn't match the left side cover. Its about 3-4" shorter of the bottom frame. You can leave it if you don't care, or you can extend it down with more fiberglass, and add another bolt hole in the saddle bag to secure it like the left side.


So what are the minor issues to consider?

The turn signals are low to the ground and not as visible as I would like. I've found that the Custom Dynamics Plasma Rods tuck away really nicely deep in the crevasse between fender and the saddle bags.

Your options of mounting the license plate are extremely limited. The best option I found was the standard Harley three hole laydown plate mount.


Wiring

There's many ways to do this. Previously I had cut the stock wiring harnesses off and put them somewhere that I can't find them anymore. So I visited the local auto parts store and grabbed everything I needed. I bought some smallest gauge wire I could find, some wire taps, some butt connectors, and a wiring harness. In the trailer/hitch section you can find some generic 5 - 8 wire wiring harness' that have matching male/female ends with 12" of wire between them. Cut one in the middle and you got yourself a weather proof wiring harness for the bike.

I stuck the run/turn/brake module with 3M tape to the inside of the right side sub frame by the front of the seat where the bikes wiring comes out and spliced it in there. Wrapped it with electrical tape to make sure it didnt fall off. The outputs from the module terminated in one end of the harness under the front seat area where the shock is under. Zip tied it up so it wouldnt droop down. For the five lights I tapped all their grounds into one wire, and ran all the wires up the underside of the fender to the front. I covered them/hold them in place/protect them with HVAC tape. At home depot you can go to the HVAC section and find foil or duct tape that is specifically made super strong and resistant to temperatures and the elements. The end of the wires terminate in the other side of the wiring harness with just enough slack to snugly reach the other.

When it comes time to remove the fender, reach up under the wheel well and unplug the harness.

Costs

Looks good. Very nice write up. Did I miss what the finale costs was for the kit?
The kit itself is about $1800.
Then there's the painting. That's usually going to be more than the kit itself, due to the large number of items that need to be prepped and painted. You should be able to pay the painter something like $150 to cut and relay the fiberglass for any modifications. (Or do it yourself if you have a compressor tool cutter and a box fan.)
Lights will run you around $250 ($100 for radiantz strips, and $150 for the plasma rods.)
License plate mounting was around $120 (lay down mount, and radiantz lighted cover.)
Run/turn/brake module around $70
Wiring harnesses, n stuff around $40



Oh and I should also mention, Steve (STG) is a wealth of helpful information when you get stuck on something.
 

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Thanks for pioneering this kit and the extensive write up !
Looks FANTASTIC :co-ol::co-ol::co-ol:
 

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That looks amazing. Sounds like a lot of work and $ but you've got a looker!!!
 

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Im thinking I could possibly get a piece of thin metal fabricated to fit the underside of the fender tip to take the rubbing.
Try to get some titanium. Gives a very nice , bright spark when scraped fast enough :co-ol:
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Looks really good. All in all do you like it? Harley bag kits are the same way. Alot of test fit, remove, repeat.
I really dunno. Everyone keeps telling me I need to keep it, cause they all love the look. I like the look as well, after all its why I chose to spend money on it. But the impracticality of its design has kinda cooled my excitement over it.

I'll give it a few months and see if still want to keep it, or if I just sunk a huge chunk of change into a money pit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Looks good. Very nice write up. Did I miss what the finale costs was for the kit?
The kit itself is about $1800.
Then there's the painting. That's usually going to be more than the kit itself, due to the large number of items that need to be prepped and painted. You should be able to pay the painter something like $150 to cut and relay the fiberglass for any modifications. (Or do it yourself if you have a compressor tool cutter and a box fan.)
Lights will run you around $250 ($100 for radiantz strips, and $150 for the plasma rods.)
License plate mounting was around $120 (lay down mount, and radiantz lighted cover.)
Run/turn/brake module around $70
Wiring harnesses, n stuff around $40


.. Huh.. no wonder the woman's pissed about the bike..
 
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