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Referring to any custom line 1300, those that have the ABS, those that don't. Pros, Cons? Is it worth the extra money and weight? Not worth it?

Looking on Honda's site, ABS Fury is 1000 bucks more. Bike also weights a whopping 16 pounds more.
Based on a 60hp average, the power to weight ratio non ABS is 11.1 lbs per horse. ABS model is 11.35 lbs per horse.
Doesn't seem like much of a difference but on a bike, every little bit counts.

I personally would rather have seen combined braking, altho with such a small contact patch on the front tire i think the ABS may come in handy. I came from sportbikes so im used to using the front brake for most of my braking. Its always in the back of my head now how much braking the front wheel can take.

Maybe if we get enough interest in a combined braking kits, someone will make it for us??:D
 

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Refering to any custom line 1300, those that have the ABS, those that don't. Pros, Cons? Is it worth the extra money and weight? Not worth it?

I personally would rather have seen combined braking. Maybe if we get enough interest someone will make us a kit??:D
I dont know about the ABS and how well its works, but I do know it is easy to lock up the tires without it, ass end wants to kiss you, done it a few times without trying, I second that on the combined braking my VTX1800R had it and it worked very well
Regards,
Dewking
 

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Referring to any custom line 1300, those that have the ABS, those that don't. Pros, Cons? Is it worth the extra money and weight? Not worth it?

Looking on Honda's site, ABS Fury is 1000 bucks more. Bike also weights a whopping 16 pounds more.
Based on a 60hp average, the power to weight ratio non ABS is 11.1 lbs per horse. ABS model is 11.35 lbs per horse.
Doesn't seem like much of a difference but on a bike, every little bit counts.

I personally would rather have seen combined braking, altho with such a small contact patch on the front tire i think the ABS may come in handy. I came from sportbikes so im used to using the front brake for most of my braking. Its always in the back of my head now how much braking the front wheel can take.

Maybe if we get enough interest in a combined braking kits, someone will make it for us??:D
I have ABS on my Fury and it is great. Never had a lockup. The ABS version has the F+R brakes linked...but only when you use the rear brake, even then the linking is not traditional linking. On an ABS bike the front calliper has 3 pistons with the centre piston being linked to the rear, the rear calliper has two pistons compared to one on the non ABS bike. Having ridden both ABS and non ABS bikes I can say that the ABS has more powerful brakes. It is worth the extra, but if you had any doubts try stopping fast on wet roads.

The ABS has not stopped me from doing any mods so I wouldn't worry about that angle.
 

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Antilock Brake System + Combined Braking

First of all most of you guys aren't worth a thousand bucks so don't bother, surely you're replaceable
.

For those of you who value you life at more than $1000 it's a bargain. Many of you spend that much on motorcycle insurance each year where this is only an one time payment and it is more likely to let your ass remain in the saddle rather than on the pavement
. Just as fuel injection is becoming ubiquitous so will ABS. Something for your next bike if you don't have it yet.

I waited a year past the Fury introduction just to get ABS. Worked out well in giving me time to save and pay cash :) while I spent the year riding this virtual Fury aka FuryForums ;).

To my knowledge in 7000 miles (two summers) I have not had ABS activate during any of my braking with the exception of deliberate trials. When I grabbed a handful my Fury stopped without any fuss and on pavement one of the tires chirped with the cycling of brake pressure on that wheel, at least according to my license examiner during the panic stop test. He was about to fail me until I explained how ABS works. His bad.

I have more than a 1000 feet of grass or gravel driveways with steep hills and the ABS does not disappoint or dig ruts. Hasn't been a lay down yet.

None of the foregoing is very significant to my riding since I am in the slow motion stage of life, very different than my past. What is significant is the Combined Braking and it is worth every penny to me. I rarely use the front brake lever. The foot brake pedal activates both pistons in the rear caliper and only one of three pistons in the front caliper. This is more than enough brake to slow me down 98% of the time. In fact, I very often brake only below 30 mph and let engine braking do the job at higher speeds as I anticipate traffic, which is always speeding while I'm not. That's just my señor way of riding. It's a whole new experience where I have discovered how much I was missing, but don't take my word for it. Used to be an action sport for me and now I have discovered the wonderful world of laid back cruising. The combined braking just adds to the ease and comfort of the ride. Oh yeah, I think it's kinda cool to be able to come to a stop without the customary dip and bounce back, just sorta glide to a stop with a smug grin under my full face helmet :cool:.
 

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I don't regret paying extra for ABS. There is a world of difference in my braking power and the non-ABS model. I rode my buddie's VTX13000 home for him when he bought it and I told him he needed to take it back and get the brakes fixed, which he did, and they told him it was normal.:confused: Maybe the non-ABS folks just don't realize what we feel when we hit the brakes.

I'm not sure I've experienced the ABS kicking in but I've tried by hitting both brakes hard at 85mph which tested my arm strength to the limit. No lock up. Extremely short stopping distance.

Personally, I use both brakes every time even with the linking. Being able to apply controlled light braking on a curve is a skill I don't want to get rusty on.

Can't lie to you, I've paid more for a couple of mods but I would do it again.
 

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Personally, I use both brakes every time even with the linking. Being able to apply controlled light braking on a curve is a skill I don't want to get rusty on.
If you ride the least bit aggressively that is the necessary way to brake. I ride just the opposite. The wonder of ABS is that even a novice rider is protected from disproportionate braking :D excluding extreme circumstances of course :eek:.
 

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I don't regret paying extra for ABS. There is a world of difference in my braking power and the non-ABS model. I rode my buddie's VTX13000 home for him when he bought it and I told him he needed to take it back and get the brakes fixed, which he did, and they told him it was normal.:confused: Maybe the non-ABS folks just don't realize what we feel when we hit the brakes.
That's exactly what I found when I rode a non ABS Fury!
 

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I would have loved to have combined braking on my non abs sabre.
You could do for around $700 from Direct Line Parts (rear master & two calipers w pads) plus lines and fittings. Probably a grand all in. If I was in your position and had this experience with combined brakes I'd spend the money only because I've put so much work into my Fury already and would lose too much trading up. That's how much I like combined braking now but it's also a riding style preference.

macXpert has about the same mileage on his ABS Fury as mine but he rides with conventional braking technique and he's on his second set of front pads whereas mine are like new (as are my rears). Ironically I spent the extra grand just to get the ABS as insurance not caring that much about the combined braking. Although it intrigued me at the time I had never had the experience. I did have to retrain myself on braking methods since I would never dream of braking a non ABS bike this way. Bottom line: It only works with a very laid back riding style :rolleyes:.
 

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More on Linked Brakes

A couple of years ago when I was riding the Big Sur Coast Highway south of Monterey, California (with macXpert) I was being a 'little' aggressive on the curves. Riding on the side of a 1000 foot sheer cliff half the curves are blind and many are decreasing radius. A number of curves were tighter than expected and thus my speed too high but by using the foot brake alone (front and rear combined) I was amazed at how the Fury pulled back onto the correct line. On my last bike with normal brakes, using just the the foot pedal (rear brake only) under those conditions made my rear wheel slide outwards since there was no balance with the front brake. Using the hand lever (front brake only) forced the bike upright making the bike head off the road. Of course, braking with both foot and hand levers is required but not always done with the optimum balance in a hurried situation so results do vary.

Combined brakes yield an amazing safety benefit since we all occasionally get caught with that "OH SHIT" feeling when entering a corner too fast. Just a quick touch of the combined brake foot pedal immediately brings the bike and the corner back into the comfort zone. I consciously use this feature all the time when braking in corners and it feels like the hand of God is reaching down to guide me safely through. The strange thing is, I have never heard of using this technique from anyone, yet considering how well it works it must be the world's best kept secret :eek:
 

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Combined brakes yield an amazing safety benefit since we all occasionally get caught with that "OH SHIT" feeling when entering a corner too fast. Just a quick touch of the combined brake foot pedal immediately brings the bike and the corner back into the comfort zone. I consciously use this feature all the time when braking in corners and it feels like the hand of God is reaching down to guide me safely through. The strange thing is, I have never heard of using this technique from anyone, yet considering how well it works it must be the world's best kept secret :eek:
I've done the same thing myself, a quick dab of the combined brakes in a corner. I'd never do that with conventional brakes though. The other technique I use a lot is trail braking, where you stay on the rear (or combined) brake well into the corner, letting it of gradually as you go through the corner. It's hard to explain but it keeps the front end loaded and allows you to go through the corner faster or safer depending on what you prefer. It also allows you to brake quite hard when in a corner if you have to. A lot of racing guys use the technique.


Here is a quick quote from Wikipedia

"Trail braking is a motorcycle riding and driving technique where the brakes are used beyond the entrance to a turn and are gradually released up to the point of apex.

In a broader scope, trailing off the braking pressure either while straight line braking or, as above, after turn in has begun, allows for a less abrupt and more accurate final corner entry speed adjustment. Some corner entries, such as decreasing radius turns, are more adapted to the leaned over trail braking technique."

"Guides such as the Motorcycle Safety Foundation Basic RiderCourse teach that the safest way for a beginning rider to approach a corner on a motorcycle is by performing all of the slowing before the entrance of the turn, discouraging the use of any brakes while the motorcycle is leaned over.The argument against trail braking on the street, at least for beginners, is that the steep learning curve of trail braking makes it appropriate only for the race track. The benefit of learning trail braking to the street rider is that knowing and understanding how to slow while entering a corner gives a greater safety margin, particularly in blind, decreasing radius or downhill corners.

Freddie Spencer, founder of the now defunct Freddie Spencer's High Performance Riding School as well as Nick Ienatsch, author of the 2003 book Sport Riding Techniques and chief instructor of Yamaha Champions Riding School argue that trail braking should be used in nearly every corner as a means to help the motorcycle change direction, stating that trail braking gives the rider more control and significantly increases rider safety."
 

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The other technique I use a lot is trail braking, where you stay on the rear (or combined) brake well into the corner, letting it of gradually as you go through the corner. A lot of racing guys use the technique.
Now I know why you are replacing brake pads and I'm not :D.
Seriously though, we ride slow and you are always behind me. What's up with that :confused:.
Not to mention that these are hardly race bikes :rolleyes:.
 

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Well, the bikes are heavy. There is a lot of kinetic energy to get rid off. Not so much the speed. The weight is enough, I guess. And if the more seasoned rider use his engine braking to the max you may have some difference.
 

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Now I know why you are replacing brake pads and I'm not :D.
Seriously though, we ride slow and you are always behind me. What's up with that :confused:.
Not to mention that these are hardly race bikes :rolleyes:.
Well...........I think it has more to do with where and when we ride. I ride to work often so I'm in rush hour traffic, stop and go, traffic lights every few hundred meters. Not to forget the fixed speed cameras, mobile speed cameras, radar speed traps and the definition of speeding being 1 KPH over the posted limit,you get the picture. On weekends when I do a longer ride I have the Mrs with me so that adds another 50KG that I have to stop. :)
 

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Traditional brake (non-ABS)

I guess I'm the only one still left in the non-ABS camp. And I'm a young guy (31) compared to most of the crowd in this forum community. I learned on an R6 to begin with (140+ HP at the twist of a wrist), without ABS, and bit the asphalt HARD a few times. And yeah, it cost me quite a bit to repair bits and bobs, and replace fairings, and a few tail sections. But I was 19 and just learning what a motorcycle was, but it definitely made me respect the power, and it showed me just how mortal I am. Now, granted, my story is probably more on the positive scale, as I had a friend who bought 'Busa to learn on and subsequently wrapped it around a tree, but all good things can be enjoyed in moderation. A fistful of throttle on ANY bike can be deadly in the wrong situation.

NOW WAIT!!! Please don't get me wrong, I wholeheartedly agree that ABS is certainly SAFER for novice riders to learn on....

But I can genuinely attest that I've never ridden any bike equipped with ABS so I don't know how it feels, which I imagine is quite different from the vigorous thumping of a pedal against your toes, like in a car. But I spent 10 years across 6 different sport bikes and even now I have to LITERALLY FORCE MYSELF to think about using the rear brake. Which, if I'm being entirely honest, I don't even register it exists on the Fury unless I lock it up and intentionally drift the bike around a corner. But for straight-line stopping power... even with BRAND-NEW brake pads.... the Fury rear brake has about as much stopping force as putting your feet down at 60 mph.

I ride what some of these guys would certainly classify as "excessive"... which is also why I switched to a cruiser. I can very easily break the rear wheel loose and fishtail off a stop light, or drift a corner with the rear wheel well past apex, or drag my pegs so hard that my boots are missing pieces of rubber. I wanted all the fun of being stupid without the risk of doing said stupid thing at 168 mph. Which is the fastest I've been on a street before I saw God and decided it was a good time to slow down.

But I will say this... I'm able to have a lot more fun on my Fury and I only get pulled over by the cops SOME of the times vs ALL of the time when I rode sports. Lol. But GOD do I miss having 100+ ponies at my immediate disposal. I got rid of it bc I knew it would kill me, but I still miss it like a cocaine addict. But never once did I think ABS would have saved me from any of my spills. But most of my spills were from being dumb in a parking lot with too much horsepower for my own good. Lol.
 
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