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Replaced my missing seat bolt with this license plate frame bolt. Kinda fits the theme of the bike, and is longer than the older one, though I had to add a makeshift plastic washer in there to save my paint. I like that you can really crank this one down, too, with their 'security wrench'.
 

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Replaced my missing seat bolt with this license plate frame bolt. Kinda fits the theme of the bike, and is longer than the older one, though I had to add a makeshift plastic washer in there to save my paint. I like that you can really crank this one down, too, with their 'security wrench'.
Just be cautious about big bumps if the bolt is longer because it will hang down and may contact the tire.
 

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I finished modding my extended forward controls to make them work on my bike (Bought from dealer, pretty sure it was from another bike)

Removed honda logo's and reflectors (Kept fork reflectors as I checked with my local PD and they said at least had to have front fork reflectors)
 

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Well, the bike is torn down right now due to some information that was not disclosed to me upon purchase of the bike, so I took the time to do a couple projects.

Started placing all of my ground LED's on the bike in their locations:

Green LED kit. The adhesive on the back is worthless on these LED's unfortunately, so I added my own 3M double sided tape. Its almost rubber-ish and it GRIPS!:




Front fender:



Rear fender:



Upper frame rails:





Jumper wire from the headlight fuse for keyed power. Eventually I'm going to wire in a distribution block but until then:



I will put 4 more strips on the inside of the lower frame rail as well, but I can't do that until it's standing on its own feet again.

Also sanded and repainted my forks while they were off the bike:

 

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Tested out the LED's on the bike. This is just 2 LED strips on the frame rail and LED strips on the rear fender frame ( 1 each per side). Then I'll have 2 in the front fender, and 4 on the lower frame. Will be bright at night:



Edit: I should mention too that I'm going to use the kickstand as my "switch". By utilizing a snap switch, I can wire it up normally open or normally closed depending on how I want it to activate with the kickstand. Preliminary tinkering suggests that I'm going to have to mount and wire it in the normally closed position. Ie, with the kickstand down, no pressure will be on the switch lever, and the switch will complete my ground circuit. So with the key on, and kickstand down, lights will always be on. As soon as the kickstand is up, and puts pressure on that switch, circuit (ground) is broken and the LED's are off.

I'm not sure how the bike going over rough roads effects the kickstand (ie if it bounces around a lot?) but I don't think it will be an issue because the switch will be up by the mounting bolt of the kickstand...minimal movement there if any.

The switch is rated for .3A @ 250V DC and .6A @ 125V DC, but that rating should increase for a 12V system (if you keep halving the voltage the amp rating will increase) so I'm not worried about the LED's overloading and melting the switch. My LED's will draw about 1A of power in total, shouldn't effect any of the wiring for the headlight circuit at all either.

 

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Also sanded and repainted my forks while they were off the bike:

Wanted to note on this also that I used VHT's Roll Bar and Chassis Paint. I followed the instructions to a tee. Most rattle paint I've used in the past isn't very robust. I checked last night (it's been curing for a few days now) first with the fingernail test on the paint in an inconspicuous area, then with a dime to see if I could scratch/chip the paint, and it held up. So I think it is a promising paint out of a can to hold up to some abuse.
 

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You may wish to use a small toggle switch in a thru-hole on the left battery-box cover toward the middle so it's hidden and out of the dirt-encrusted environment of the netherworld wherein the kickstand resides. Fewer mounting issues, lower failure rate, turns on'off when you want, don't have to power the ECU, tail lights, headlight just to have the LEDs on.
 

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You may wish to use a small toggle switch in a thru-hole on the left battery-box cover toward the middle so it's hidden and out of the dirt-encrusted environment of the netherworld wherein the kickstand resides. Fewer mounting issues, lower failure rate, turns on'off when you want, don't have to power the ECU, tail lights, headlight just to have the LEDs on.
That's the whole reason I'm using the snap switch as I don't want to use a toggle to manually turn them on or off. I've already drilled enough in the side cover for the battery (air ride toggles) and it's more of a PITA to take off than it's worth unless I need to (since the air lines are connected there).

It is illegal to ride in WA with ground lighting on. I know it would be rare, but if I forgot about the toggle and rode around with them it's just grounds to get stopped. Out here, you even tend to get stopped when you are completely legal, they just want to hassle you.

As well, I only want the lights to come on with keyed power. Having them on will light the situations where I'm taking gear off, putting my helmet on the lock, etc. If I were to forget about them being on, I wouldn't want battery to be dead. Plus then there is the potential of a parasitic drain.

This idea was the easiest way to "set it and forget it" and be legal in my state. I can always run a toggle switch as well as having the kickstand switch, but I think I would run it up on the bars with a locking momentary or something.

There is definitely debris down there by the kickstand, but where I'm thinking of mounting there was very little dirt because it's tucked up underneath the side cover, but the kickstand bracket protects it from grime coming from underneath, and the actual radius of the kickstand protects it from grime coming from the front of the bike.

I guess we'll see though, I'll test it out and see how it does. I tend not to ride in the harsh elements anyway unless I get caught in a squall or something. It's dangerous enough during a sunny day with the cagers around here, introduce bad weather and it's full on suicide mission...
 

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Along with my LED completion and finishing my new Air Ride cylinder install last night, I pieced together the Green Reaper's new front pogo sticks.

A big thanks to @460brevill for the donor forks with good fork tubes and @Kbuskill for the lower crown.

The lower crown was definitely the root cause of the twist in my old steering between the crown and the axle. Before I installed I put the, next to each other side by side and sure enough you could see it in my old one.

So I installed the freshly painted forks with the new parts and she is straight as an arrow!! It's a nice feeling riding it that way!

Sorry about the messy garage photos, I have tools and wiring everywhere. 3 projects at once will do that. Cleanup is tonight because I wanted to ride it last night:

 

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Along with my LED completion and finishing my new Air Ride cylinder install last night, I pieced together the Green Reaper's new front pogo sticks.

A big thanks to @460brevill for the donor forks with good fork tubes and @Kbuskill for the lower crown.

The lower crown was definitely the root cause of the twist in my old steering between the crown and the axle. Before I installed I put the, next to each other side by side and sure enough you could see it in my old one.

So I installed the freshly painted forks with the new parts and she is straight as an arrow!! It's a nice feeling riding it that way!

Sorry about the messy garage photos, I have tools and wiring everywhere. 3 projects at once will do that. Cleanup is tonight because I wanted to ride it last night:

Looking good Krash. Glad you are back together.:wink:
 

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Along with my LED completion and finishing my new Air Ride cylinder install last night, I pieced together the Green Reaper's new front pogo sticks.

A big thanks to @460brevill for the donor forks with good fork tubes and @Kbuskill for the lower crown.

The lower crown was definitely the root cause of the twist in my old steering between the crown and the axle. Before I installed I put the, next to each other side by side and sure enough you could see it in my old one.

So I installed the freshly painted forks with the new parts and she is straight as an arrow!! It's a nice feeling riding it that way!

Sorry about the messy garage photos, I have tools and wiring everywhere. 3 projects at once will do that. Cleanup is tonight because I wanted to ride it last night:

A little 'green' with envy over the shop. At least mine have a place, nothing as fancy as this though.





One of my jobs this spring is to get power out there. Nothing fancy, just enough to run lights, charge some batteries. House has an empty breaker, just need to string it.
 

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A little 'green' with envy over the shop. At least mine have a place, nothing as fancy as this though.





One of my jobs this spring is to get power out there. Nothing fancy, just enough to run lights, charge some batteries. House has an empty breaker, just need to string it.
Hey I dig that shed shop! I'd love to have one also to park the bikes in so I could free up some wrenching room in the garage for the vehicles!
 

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Moditis has hit again.

Saw a set of these browsing and had to have them. I think they fit the Green Reaper theme well.

I went the opposite of the posted image though and did black blades with a green adjuster.

Well, I got my set installed yesterday. They were really easy to install, pretty straight forward.

Review

Looks: A+
Functionality, Brake Side: A+
Functionality, Clutch Side: F

Here's a few photos installed:
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234831


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These are nice because they have a "throw" adjuster, which means relative to the cam mechanism that bolts into the housing on the bars, the lever can be adjusted out and in for reach...ie different sized hands.

I'm running "Glen's Clutch Pull" bracket because I'm in a lot of traffic, so it takes a lot less force to activate the clutch. But after I got that, I had to make a pretty decent adjustment on the barrel adjuster down on the engine case to get the release and clamping of the pressure plate onto the disks back into range. So there isn't a lot of cable adjustment left down there.

Below are a couple of shots of the difference of lever profiles between stock and the blade levers:

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This profile is what makes the clutch side not work so well. You can tell by the levers that the blade lever will hit the grip well before stock in that orientation. Which means for the same cable adjustment as stock, it won't pull enough cable, or "push" the pressure plate off the disks as far as the OEM lever would allow.

I confirmed this by clicking it into first and picking my feet up. The bike, with my weight would slowly creep forward. I mean barely, so the adjustment was close. Now, with these levers, the throw comes into play. If you set the levers' throw to be as far from the bar as possible, you will get extra pull on the cable, or push on the pressure plate so it's not engaging the clutch pack when you pull the lever all the way in.

But with the throw set all the way away from the bar, you need to have monster hands. It was really hard to reach the lever comfortably. What this essentially does is shift feel of when the clutch pack engages...ie it moves it away from the bar. You can also tighten the cable and this will also allow you, when the lever is pulled, to disengage the pressure plate further from the clutch pack. You have to be careful with all these combinations, because eventually the cam comes to a hard stop against the housing (on the lever). If the pressure plate isn't fully released onto the clutch pack, you'll always be slipping the clutch and it will be worn out fast.

So what was the issue? Shifting through the gears while riding was fine. Getting the bike into neutral while the bike was shut off? Easy. Getting the bike into neutral at a dead stop (lever pulled in) from first gear (biike running)...wasn't gonna happen. Rolling into a light and putting it in neutral...sometimes.

Maybe these will work for stock clutch pack, stock pressure plate rod bracket, etc, but I could not make them work with my setup where the lever was still comfortable to reach with a reasonable bite point (Glen's mod, Barnett clutch pack, Barnett pressure plate springs) without worrying about the clutch pack slipping.

If the profile of these levers was changed up a bit, I believe it could work. Time to look for something else that will go with the theme.
 
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