Honda Fury Forums: banner

1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
need help my bike will not idle when in gear. after disconnecting battery the other day to install florida joe led lights bike will only idle in neutral if i pull in the clutch and let off the throttle bike dies even going down the road. my bike is still stock as far as exhaust and intake.
any ideals ?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
622 Posts
have you checked your fuses, u may have surged the ecm , or bcm which ever one is correct term for our bikes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,152 Posts
Sounds kinda crazy but try charging the battery. The stator on the fury doesn't do a very good job by itself keeping the battery charged and low battery voltage can cause strange things to happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,409 Posts
Are you holding in the clutch?:D Kidding.
On a more serious note. Is it pulling at all when you have the clutch in and you put it in gear? Clutch might be so loose that it is stalling it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
it could be the battery cause one time after it died when i went to restart it reset my trip and everything. i keep it charged with a battery tender when not riding much. Guess ill try and take it up to dealer tomorrow and have them check the battery. weird thing is i couldnt make it do it after stopping for dinner tonight but did have problems up until i stopped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
377 Posts
I will try to find where I read about constantly using a trickle charger is not really a good idea, may take a while since I bounce around so many different forums. The basic reason is that it shortens the lifespan of the battery, but the technical or the "that makes sense" reasons I will try to find and post on here. Not that using a trickle charger is bad, just that using one constantly is.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,454 Posts
it could be the battery cause one time after it died when i went to restart it reset my trip and everything. i keep it charged with a battery tender when not riding much. Guess ill try and take it up to dealer tomorrow and have them check the battery. weird thing is i couldnt make it do it after stopping for dinner tonight but did have problems up until i stopped.
remember fellow fury dudes, my battery had collapsed cell walls. had it replaced last week.
zero'd out my odo and started poorly when hot.

i believe the battery has a 2 year warranty--not sure--but, there is precedent here. quite a few posts re: shoddy re-starting and shorts.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,751 Posts
well i kind of agree with the statement about the trickle charger, don't just throw it on there and let it stay all the time, but you should throw it on at least once a month and let it trickle charge the battery, especially during winter when the bike is not ridden, i have the clamps attached to my battery so during the winter all i have to do is plug it into the charger and come back later and unplug it and throw the side cover back on, i was told from the dealership to do that at least once a month.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,706 Posts
why not try resetting the computer on the bike and see if that helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
i dont leave it on all the time but do try and put it on trickle charge every two to three weeks if i dont have much time to ride it. i dropped it off at the dealership today guess ill find out what it is next week.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,348 Posts
I talked to a sales manager at Battery Mart. He said if you ride for thirty minuets at highway speed, 50+ for thirty minuets you are good for the week. Any week you don't, put a trickle on overnight once. This will prevent the sulfides from building up and then settling on the plates and bottom of battery, which then gives you weak acid. For winter, do not let battery stay in freezing cold, store in warm place and trickle charge occasionally. Your trickle charger should be matched to your battery.

Also go to post 12, by Clueless, he provided a link for some good info. Some is Quoted Below.

When A Battery Is Being Charged
Charging is a process that reverses the electrochemical reaction. It converts the electrical energy of the charger into chemical energy. Remember, a battery does not store electricity; it stores the chemical energy necessary to produce electricity.
A battery charger reverses the current flow, providing that the charger has a greater voltage than the battery. The charger creates an excess of electrons at the negative plates, and the positive hydrogen ions are attracted to them. The hydrogen reacts with the lead sulfate to form sulfuric acid and lead, and when most of the sulfate is gone, hydrogen rises from the negative plates. The oxygen in the water reacts with the lead sulfate on the positive plates to turn them once again into lead dioxide, and oxygen bubbles rise from the positive plates when the reaction is almost complete.
Many people think that a battery’s internal resistance is high when the battery is fully charged, and this is not the case. If you think about it, you’ll remember that the lead sulfate acts as an insulator. The more sulfate on the plates, the higher the battery’s internal resistance. The higher resistance of a discharged battery allows it to accept a higher rate of charge without gassing or overheating than when the battery is near full charge. Near full charge, there isn’t much sulfate left to sustain the reverse chemical reaction. The level of charge current that can be applied without overheating the battery or breaking down the electrolyte into hydrogen and oxygen is known as the battery’s "natural absorption rate." When charge current is in excess of this natural absorption rate, overcharging occurs. The battery may overheat, and the electrolyte will bubble. Actually, some of the charging current is wasted as heat even at correct charging levels, and this inefficiency creates the need to put more amp hours back into a battery than were taken out. More on that later.
How Long Will My Battery Last?
There are many things that can cause a battery to fail or drastically shorten its life. One of those things is allowing a battery to remain in a partially discharged state. We talked about sulfate forming on the surface of the battery’s plates during discharge, and the sulfate also forms as a result of self-discharge. Sulfate also forms quickly if the electrolyte level is allowed to drop to the point that the plates are exposed. If this sulfate is allowed to remain on the plates, the crystals will grow larger and harden till they become impossible to remove through charging. Therefore, the amount of available surface area for the chemical reaction will be permanently reduced. This condition is known as "sulfation," and it permanently reduces the battery’s capacity. A 20 amp hour battery may start performing like a 16 amp hour (or smaller) battery, losing voltage rapidly under load and failing to maintain sufficient voltage during cranking to operate the bike’s ignition system. This last condition is evident when the engine refuses to fire until you remove your finger from the start button. When you release the starter, the battery voltage instantly jumps back up to a sufficient level. Since the engine is still turning briefly, the now energized ignition will fire the spark plugs. In the next installment, we’ll see exactly why increased internal resistance due to sulfation causes less power to be delivered to the starter.
Deep discharging is another battery killer. Each time the battery is deeply discharged, some of the active material drops off of the plates and falls to the bottom of the battery case. Naturally, this leaves less of the stuff to conduct the chemical reaction. If enough of this material accumulates in the bottom of the case, it’ll short the plates together and kill the battery.
Overcharging is an insidious killer; its effects often aren’t apparent to the innocent purchaser of the ten-dollar trickle charger who leaves it hooked to the battery for extended periods. A trickle charger charges at a constant rate regardless of the battery state of charge. If that rate is more than the battery’s natural absorption rate at full charge, the electrolyte will begin to break down and boil away. Many a rider has stored a bike all winter on a trickle charger only to find the battery virtually empty in the spring. Also, since charging tends to oxidize the positive plates, continued overcharging can corrode the plates or connectors till they weaken and break.
Undercharging is a condition that exists on many Gold Wings. Your voltage regulator is set to maintain your system voltage at around 14 to 14.4 volts. If you’re one of those folks who rides the interstate highways with your voltmeter showing only 13.5 volts because you’re burning more lights than Macy’s Christmas display, you should be aware that that voltage is sufficient to maintain a charged battery but insufficient to fully recharge a depleted one. Remember, we said that gassing occurs when all or most of the lead sulfate has been converted back to lead and lead dioxide. The voltage at which this normally occurs, known as the gassing voltage, is normally just above 14 volts. If your system voltage never gets that high, and if you don’t ever compensate by hooking up to a charger at home, the sulfate will begin to accumulate and harden just as plaque does in your mouth. Consider a thorough occasional charging to be like a good job of flossing and brushing your teeth. If you practice poor dental hygiene, you can go to the dentist, and have him blast and scrape at the yucky stuff. When your battery reaches that stage, it’s curtains!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,751 Posts
I talked to a sales manager at Battery Mart. He said if you ride for thirty minuets at highway speed, 50+ for thirty minuets you are good for the week. Any week you don't, put a trickle on overnight once. This will prevent the sulfides from building up and then settling on the plates and bottom of battery, which then gives you weak acid. For winter, do not let battery stay in freezing cold, store in warm place and trickle every 2 to 3 weeks overnight. After a couple months turn battery over for five minuets to let sulfides drop off the bottom to the top, then trickle. Your trickle charger should be matched to your battery.
good information as always!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,454 Posts
good info except i've never seen a $10 trickle charger. Now, if you ever see one advertised...and you buy it--you deserve all the bad karma that will come from such a mis-informed purchase.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,731 Posts
I just dropped my bike off at the shop yesterday for erratic slow starting. About 1 in 10 starts the bike will barely turn over, but will eventually start. It doesn’t matter if it’s cold, hot, running for an hour at 50 miles per hour or what. It started last spring. Most notably when I would stop for fuel. The bike being shut off for about 10 minutes seemed to recreate the symptom. Meaning, I could start, stop, start, stop and no problems. Let it sit for 10 minutes and I would have problems. Odometer and clock would reset just like others have experienced. I took it to the dealer in the spring and they re-charged the battery. The bike ran fine all summer, and now it is starting it again. They are going to check the battery and charging system. I’ll let you know what they find.
 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Top