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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There's just no end to this! heheheheh After installing the V&H Cruzers and posting my little "how-to" a few weeks ago I thought I was done...then she had to have the Fury windshield which, by the way has great mounting hardware and really looks cool...it just doesn't work very well. So, I did some experimenting with some relatively cheap Home Depot plastic before baking the "good stuff", came up with a design that works and now have a windshield that does something besides looking cool. Here's a brief description of what I did...just remember when you're baking Lexan that different ovens heat differently (with respect to the accuracy of their temperature) and different wives react differently to you baking Lexan in the oven (with respect to whose windshield it is - hers or yours. If it's hers you're good to go.) First it goes without saying that you must already own or have purchased the Honda Fury windscreen. Install it and then ride the bike. This ride will give you the incentive you need to proceed with the rest of the installation. Obtain a 24" by 24" piece of smoked Lexan and cut it in half. I got mine from McMaster-Carr - about $25.00. This size gives you two shots at getting it right. Scribe the exact shape of the Fury screen onto the backing paper of one of the pieces. Then find an Electraglide with a batwing fairing (I used mine) and scribe the arc of that windshield to where it meets the edges of the Fury windscreen. Next find a Chevy Silverado full size pick-up truck and park it just outside from where your oven is located. Cover the top part of one of the tires with a bath towel folded in half. Fill up a gallon water jug and set it beside the tire. Obtain a full size cookie-sheet - make sure it has no oil on it. Place the piece of Lexan (the one you've drawn on) on the cookie sheet. Take an all-metal pie server and place it just under one of the edges of the Lexan (where there is adequate distance from your drawn line). Put the whole affair in the oven at 350 degrees and bake for about 20 minutes. Starting at about 18 minutes in, open the door and lift the pie server to see if the Lexan is starting to become pliable - I'd recommend using a towel or something between your hand and the server too. Keep periodically checking until the Lexan easily bends. (It's easy to go too far here - as in too hot - and wrinkle the stuff.) When it becomes bendable, take cookie sheet and all out to the Silverado, slide the Lexan on to the towel-covered tire tread and quickly press down on each end of the Lexan - again I recommend using protection for your hands! :) As you hold the Lexan down against the tire your arc will form. After a minute or two ask your wife (the owner of the windshield who for this sole reason is even putting up with your shenanigans) to pour that gallon of water over the Lexan, you, the towel, your feet, etc. With a little - no, a lot of - luck you'll soon be holding a piece of undamaged but properly bent Lexan in your hands. Cut to the line, dress the edge with a belt sander followed by sandpaper (320, 600, 1000, 1500), drill the holes (using the Honda screen for location), clean the edges of the holes AND THEN remove the paper and install the new windshield. Note: In case you're wondering why I didn't make the cut before bending (when the plastic was flat). I tried it that way on the prototypes and found that if there's gonna be a wrinkle or heat damage it's likely gonna be at the edge so doing it this way the "edges" are far away from the cut line. Worked for me on the "final" windshield. Pictures are attached. No I won't make one for you. Yes, you can use a Ford instead of a Chevy
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The two pics attached to my post are it. It follows the exact same lines (width and rake) as the Honda shield. The only difference is it is higher (the arc) by about 4 inches.
 

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That turned out really good!

I used the oven method in the past for making some custom clear corners for some cars, never thought about a widshield for a bike. :D

Congrats!
:cool:
 

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There's just no end to this! heheheheh After installing the V&H Cruzers and posting my little "how-to" a few weeks ago I thought I was done...then she had to have the Fury windshield which, by the way has great mounting hardware and really looks cool...it just doesn't work very well. So, I did some experimenting with some relatively cheap Home Depot plastic before baking the "good stuff", came up with a design that works and now have a windshield that does something besides looking cool. Here's a brief description of what I did...just remember when you're baking Lexan that different ovens heat differently (with respect to the accuracy of their temperature) and different wives react differently to you baking Lexan in the oven (with respect to whose windshield it is - hers or yours. If it's hers you're good to go.) First it goes without saying that you must already own or have purchased the Honda Fury windscreen. Install it and then ride the bike. This ride will give you the incentive you need to proceed with the rest of the installation. Obtain a 24" by 24" piece of smoked Lexan and cut it in half. I got mine from McMaster-Carr - about $25.00. This size gives you two shots at getting it right. Scribe the exact shape of the Fury screen onto the backing paper of one of the pieces. Then find an Electraglide with a batwing fairing (I used mine) and scribe the arc of that windshield to where it meets the edges of the Fury windscreen. Next find a Chevy Silverado full size pick-up truck and park it just outside from where your oven is located. Cover the top part of one of the tires with a bath towel folded in half. Fill up a gallon water jug and set it beside the tire. Obtain a full size cookie-sheet - make sure it has no oil on it. Place the piece of Lexan (the one you've drawn on) on the cookie sheet. Take an all-metal pie server and place it just under one of the edges of the Lexan (where there is adequate distance from your drawn line). Put the whole affair in the oven at 350 degrees and bake for about 20 minutes. Starting at about 18 minutes in, open the door and lift the pie server to see if the Lexan is starting to become pliable - I'd recommend using a towel or something between your hand and the server too. Keep periodically checking until the Lexan easily bends. (It's easy to go too far here - as in too hot - and wrinkle the stuff.) When it becomes bendable, take cookie sheet and all out to the Silverado, slide the Lexan on to the towel-covered tire tread and quickly press down on each end of the Lexan - again I recommend using protection for your hands! :) As you hold the Lexan down against the tire your arc will form. After a minute or two ask your wife (the owner of the windshield who for this sole reason is even putting up with your shenanigans) to pour that gallon of water over the Lexan, you, the towel, your feet, etc. With a little - no, a lot of - luck you'll soon be holding a piece of undamaged but properly bent Lexan in your hands. Cut to the line, dress the edge with a belt sander followed by sandpaper (320, 600, 1000, 1500), drill the holes (using the Honda screen for location), clean the edges of the holes AND THEN remove the paper and install the new windshield. Note: In case you're wondering why I didn't make the cut before bending (when the plastic was flat). I tried it that way on the prototypes and found that if there's gonna be a wrinkle or heat damage it's likely gonna be at the edge so doing it this way the "edges" are far away from the cut line. Worked for me on the "final" windshield. Pictures are attached. No I won't make one for you. Yes, you can use a Ford instead of a Chevy
The fury windshield is a problem because it creats a turblence right at my head- so much so it is a problem-- I am 6 feet/ taller torso// question did your windshiel raise the air flow higher over the rider? if so how much?
I have always had this problem with the smaller stock Honda windshields- can't use a normal one
PAUL bARNES
austin, texas
[email protected]
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The fury windshield is a problem because it creats a turblence right at my head- so much so it is a problem-- I am 6 feet/ taller torso// question did your windshiel raise the air flow higher over the rider? if so how much?
I have always had this problem with the smaller stock Honda windshields- can't use a normal one
PAUL bARNES
austin, texas
[email protected]
Not sure...every time I try to measure it I run off the road!! heheheh

Seriously tho', it's much better, was worth the effort to me. That said, it's still a teeny tiny windshield compared to a "real" windshield but the way I look at it, it is a chopper...can't have all the amenities and still capture the "look". Any one who buys this bike for comfort bought the wrong bike but...it does every thing very well.
 
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